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indulge
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Emma
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indulge
Used In
Emma
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  • She ran away to indulge the inclination, leaving the tender and the sublime of pleasure to Harriet’s share.
  • I know the danger of indulging such speculations.
  • And she leaned back in the corner, to indulge her murmurs, or to reason them away; probably a little of both—such being the commonest process of a not ill-disposed mind.
  • "It is a great pleasure where one can indulge in it," said the young man, "though there are not many houses that I should presume on so far; but in coming home I felt I might do any thing."
  • That he should never have been able to indulge so amiable a feeling before, passed suspiciously through Emma’s brain; but still, if it were a falsehood, it was a pleasant one, and pleasantly handled.
  • These were pleasant feelings, and she walked about and indulged them till it was necessary to do as the others did, and collect round the strawberry-beds.
  • I do not look upon myself as either prosperous or indulged.
  • —You will observe that I have not yet indulged myself in calling her by that name, even to you.
  • Mrs. Weston, with her baby on her knee, indulging in such reflections as these, was one of the happiest women in the world.
  • — When the suggestions of hope, however, which must follow here, presented themselves, she could not presume to indulge them.
  • —I was saying this to Mr. Cole but yesterday, and he quite agreed with me; only he is so particularly fond of music that he could not help indulging himself in the purchase, hoping that some of our good neighbours might be so obliging occasionally to put it to a better use than we can; and that really is the reason why the instrument was bought—or else I am sure we ought to be ashamed of it.
  • — She could only resolve at last, that she would still avoid a meeting with her, and communicate all that need be told by letter; that it would be inexpressibly desirable to have her removed just now for a time from Highbury, and—indulging in one scheme more—nearly resolve, that it might be practicable to get an invitation for her to Brunswick Square.
  • They met readily and smiling, but with a consciousness which at first allowed little to be said; and having all sat down again, there was for some time such a blank in the circle, that Emma began to doubt whether the wish now indulged, which she had long felt, of seeing Frank Churchill once more, and of seeing him with Jane, would yield its proportion of pleasure.
  • "That is," replied Mr. Knightley, "she will indulge her even more than she did you, and believe that she does not indulge her at all.
  • "That is," replied Mr. Knightley, "she will indulge her even more than she did you, and believe that she does not indulge her at all.

  • There are no more uses of "indulge" in the book.


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  • She indulges her children more than is good for them.
  • I indulge my taste for sweets more than is good for me.

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