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affectation
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Emma
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affectation
Used In
Emma
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  • The thing is determined, that is (laughing affectedly) as far as I can presume to determine any thing without the concurrence of my lord and master.
  • Mr. Weston—(laughing affectedly) I must protest against that.
  • They had music; Emma was obliged to play; and the thanks and praise which necessarily followed appeared to her an affectation of candour, an air of greatness, meaning only to shew off in higher style her own very superior performance.
  • He praised her for being without art or affectation, for having simple, honest, generous, feelings.
  • …off; she might have the assistance of fine clothes, and the privilege of bashfulness, but the man had only his own good sense to depend on; and when she considered how peculiarly unlucky poor Mr. Elton was in being in the same room at once with the woman he had just married, the woman he had wanted to marry, and the woman whom he had been expected to marry, she must allow him to have the right to look as little wise, and to be as much affectedly, and as little really easy as could be.

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  • Her apparent wealth was proven to be an affectation.
  • He’s a good actor. He can change affectations and mannerisms like most people change clothes.

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