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  • The Coxes were wondering last night whether she would get into any great family.
  • How did you think the Coxes looked?
  • Miss Nash thinks either of the Coxes would be very glad to marry him.
  • They talked a great deal about him, especially Anne Cox.
  • "You and Miss Smith, and Miss Fairfax, will be three, and the two Miss Coxes five," had been repeated many times over.
  • She meant to be impertinently curious, just as such an Anne Cox should be.
  • You and Miss Smith, and Miss Fairfax, will be three, and the two Miss Coxes five; and for five couple there will be plenty of room.
  • And there will be the two Gilberts, young Cox, my father, and myself, besides Mr. Knightley.
  • The party was rather large, as it included one other family, a proper unobjectionable country family, whom the Coles had the advantage of naming among their acquaintance, and the male part of Mr. Cox’s family, the lawyer of Highbury.
  • A word was put in for a second young Cox; and at last, Mr. Weston naming one family of cousins who must be included, and another of very old acquaintance who could not be left out, it became a certainty that the five couple would be at least ten, and a very interesting speculation in what possible manner they could be disposed of.
  • ’Oh!’ said I, ’I shall not forestall Jane; I left her dancing with Mr. George Otway; she will love to tell you all about it herself to-morrow: her first partner was Mr. Elton, I do not know who will ask her next, perhaps Mr. William Cox.’
  • He told her that he had been impatient to leave the dining-room—hated sitting long—was always the first to move when he could—that his father, Mr. Knightley, Mr. Cox, and Mr. Cole, were left very busy over parish business—that as long as he had staid, however, it had been pleasant enough, as he had found them in general a set of gentlemanlike, sensible men; and spoke so handsomely of Highbury altogether—thought it so abundant in agreeable families—that Emma began to feel she had beenů
  • —Much could not be hoped from the traffic of even the busiest part of Highbury;— Mr. Perry walking hastily by, Mr. William Cox letting himself in at the office-door, Mr. Cole’s carriage-horses returning from exercise, or a stray letter-boy on an obstinate mule, were the liveliest objects she could presume to expect; and when her eyes fell only on the butcher with his tray, a tidy old woman travelling homewards from shop with her full basket, two curs quarrelling over a dirty bone, andů

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  • Her diminutive size is well suited to being the coxswain.
  • He is the coxswain at Harvard.

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