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scruples
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Emma
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scruples
Used In
Emma
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  • She had no scruple with regard to him.
  • My only scruple in advising the match was on his account, as being beneath his deserts, and a bad connexion for him.
  • Without scruple—without apology—without much apparent diffidence, Mr. Elton, the lover of Harriet, was professing himself her lover.
  • By your account, he does seem to have had some scruples.
  • Harriet was soon back again, and the proposal almost immediately made; and she had no scruples which could stand many minutes against the earnest pressing of both the others.
  • Some scruples and some reluctance the widower-father may be supposed to have felt; but as they were overcome by other considerations, the child was given up to the care and the wealth of the Churchills, and he had only his own comfort to seek, and his own situation to improve as he could.
  • I have no fears at all for myself; and I should have no scruples of staying as late as Mrs. Weston, but on your account.
  • There might be scruples of delicacy, my dear Emma.
  • Trouble! aye, I know your scruples.
  • I do not scruple to say that she plays extremely well.
  • That will obviate all difficulties you know; and from us I really think, my dear Jane, you can have no scruple to accept such an accommodation.
  • While she was gone, Mr. Knightley called, and sat some time with Mr. Woodhouse and Emma, till Mr. Woodhouse, who had previously made up his mind to walk out, was persuaded by his daughter not to defer it, and was induced by the entreaties of both, though against the scruples of his own civility, to leave Mr. Knightley for that purpose.
  • — But Harriet was less humble, had fewer scruples than formerly.
  • He should have respected even unreasonable scruples, had there been such; but hers were all reasonable.
  • —Why he should feel such a scruple, why he should change his mind when it was all but done, she could not perceive.
  • I should myself have shrunk from any thing so hasty, and she would have felt every scruple of mine with multiplied strength and refinement.
  • Don’t scruple.
  • With an alacrity beyond the common impulse of a spirit which yet was never indifferent to the credit of doing every thing well and attentively, with the real good-will of a mind delighted with its own ideas, did she then do all the honours of the meal, and help and recommend the minced chicken and scalloped oysters, with an urgency which she knew would be acceptable to the early hours and civil scruples of their guests.
  • —She had been extremely surprized, never more so, than when Emma first opened the affair to her; but she saw in it only increase of happiness to all, and had no scruple in urging him to the utmost.
  • Emma wished he would be less pointed, yet could not help being amused; and when on glancing her eye towards Jane Fairfax she caught the remains of a smile, when she saw that with all the deep blush of consciousness, there had been a smile of secret delight, she had less scruple in the amusement, and much less compunction with respect to her.
  • —Then, with the gladness which must be felt, nay, which he did not scruple to feel, having never believed Frank Churchill to be at all deserving Emma, was there so much fond solicitude, so much keen anxiety for her, that he could stay no longer.

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  • She doesn’t share my scruples on the subject.
  • Her scruples were not so strong as to withstand her friend’s arguments.

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