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  • but a sanguine temper, though for ever expecting more good than occurs, does not always pay for its hopes by any proportionate depression.
  • I cannot be so sanguine as Mr. Weston.
  • In short, I can feel no dependence on his coming, and I wish Mr. Weston were less sanguine.
  • Mrs. Bates was engaged to spend the evening at Hartfield, James had due notice, and he sanguinely hoped that neither dear little Henry nor dear little John would have any thing the matter with them, while dear Emma were gone.
  • He had gone away rejected and mortified—disappointed in a very sanguine hope, after a series of what appeared to him strong encouragement; and not only losing the right lady, but finding himself debased to the level of a very wrong one.
  • Mr. Weston’s sanguine temper was a blessing on all his upright and honourable exertions; but Mr. Weston earned every present comfort before he endeavoured to gain it.
  • I would not have you too sanguine; though, however it may end, be assured your raising your thoughts to him, is a mark of good taste which I shall always know how to value.
  • She was too completely overpowered to be immediately able to reply: and two moments of silence being ample encouragement for Mr. Elton’s sanguine state of mind, he tried to take her hand again, as he joyously exclaimed— "Charming Miss Woodhouse! allow me to interpret this interesting silence.

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  • She argues that we’ve been too sanguine about the challenge in inner city schools.
  • Even the most sanguine reports point to an alarming trend.

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