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  • The simplicity and cheerfulness of her nature, her contented and grateful spirit, were a recommendation to every body, and a mine of felicity to herself.
  • What felicity it is to hear a tune again which has made one happy!
  • —Harriet is my superior in all the charm and all the felicity it gives.
  • High in the rank of her most serious and heartfelt felicities, was the reflection that all necessity of concealment from Mr. Knightley would soon be over.
  • A whole evening of back-gammon with her father, was felicity to it.
  • What years of felicity that man, in all human calculation, has before him!
  • It was a union of the highest promise of felicity in itself, and without one real, rational difficulty to oppose or delay it.
  • Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively, without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury accrue either to body or mind;—but when a beginning is made—when the felicities of rapid motion have once been, though slightly, felt—it must be a very heavy set that does not ask for more.
  • It was not with Mrs. Suckling, it was not with Mrs. Bragge, but in felicity and splendour it fell short only of them: it was with a cousin of Mrs. Bragge, an acquaintance of Mrs. Suckling, a lady known at Maple Grove.
  • —She looked back; she compared the two—compared them, as they had always stood in her estimation, from the time of the latter’s becoming known to her— and as they must at any time have been compared by her, had it—oh! had it, by any blessed felicity, occurred to her, to institute the comparison.
  • —Assured of the love of such a woman—the disinterested love, for Jane Fairfax’s character vouches for her disinterestedness; every thing in his favour,—equality of situation—I mean, as far as regards society, and all the habits and manners that are important; equality in every point but one—and that one, since the purity of her heart is not to be doubted, such as must increase his felicity, for it will be his to bestow the only advantages she wants.
  • Not that Emma was gay and thoughtless from any real felicity; it was rather because she felt less happy than she had expected.

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  • A mind always employed is always happy. This is the true secret, the grand recipe, for felicity.
    Thomas Jefferson
  • There is a time when a man distinguishes the idea of felicity from the idea of wealth; it is the beginning of wisdom.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

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