To better see all uses of the word
cordial
in
Emma
please enable javascript.

cordial -- as in: a cordial reception
Used In
Emma
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • Very much grieved and concerned— I had flattered myself that she must be better after such a cordial as I knew had been given her in the morning.
  • The beginning, however, of every visit displayed none but the properest feelings, and this being of necessity so short might be hoped to pass away in unsullied cordiality.
  • He came with Mrs. Weston, to whom and to Highbury he seemed to take very cordially.
  • Most cordially, when Miss Bates arrived, did she agree that it must.
  • They were permitted to go alone; and with a cordial nod from one, and a graceful bow from the other, the two gentlemen took leave.
  • She was received with a cordial respect which could not but please, and given all the consequence she could wish for.
  • This had just taken place and with great cordiality, when John Knightley made his appearance, and "How d’ye do, George?" and "John, how are you?" succeeded in the true English style, burying under a calmness that seemed all but indifference, the real attachment which would have led either of them, if requisite, to do every thing for the good of the other.
  • Poor Mr. Woodhouse little suspected what was plotting against him in the breast of that man whom he was so cordially welcoming, and so anxiously hoping might not have taken cold from his ride.
  • He had caught both substance and shadow—both fortune and affection, and was just the happy man he ought to be; talking only of himself and his own concerns—expecting to be congratulated—ready to be laughed at—and, with cordial, fearless smiles, now addressing all the young ladies of the place, to whom, a few weeks ago, he would have been more cautiously gallant.
  • They all seemed to remember the day, the hour, the party, the occasion—to feel the same consciousness, the same regrets—to be ready to return to the same good understanding; and they were just growing again like themselves, (Harriet, as Emma must suspect, as ready as the best of them to be cordial and happy,) when the carriage reappeared, and all was over.
  • Mrs. and Miss Bates occupied the drawing-room floor; and there, in the very moderate-sized apartment, which was every thing to them, the visitors were most cordially and even gratefully welcomed; the quiet neat old lady, who with her knitting was seated in the warmest corner, wanting even to give up her place to Miss Woodhouse, and her more active, talking daughter, almost ready to overpower them with care and kindness, thanks for their visit, solicitude for their shoes, anxious…

  • There are no more uses of "cordial" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • The countries share a long border and have cordial relations.
  • We had a cordial exchange of ideas.

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading