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conjecture
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Emma
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conjecture
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Emma
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  • Conjecture—aye, sometimes one conjectures right, and sometimes one conjectures wrong.
  • Conjecture—aye, sometimes one conjectures right, and sometimes one conjectures wrong.
  • It must be all conjecture.
  • Conjecture—aye, sometimes one conjectures right, and sometimes one conjectures wrong.
  • I wish I could conjecture how soon I shall make this rivet quite firm.
  • What nonsense one talks, Miss Woodhouse, when hard at work, if one talks at all;—your real workmen, I suppose, hold their tongues; but we gentlemen labourers if we get hold of a word—Miss Fairfax said something about conjecturing.
  • Emma saw him only once; but two or three times every day Harriet was sure just to meet with him, or just to miss him, just to hear his voice, or see his shoulder, just to have something occur to preserve him in her fancy, in all the favouring warmth of surprize and conjecture.
  • My blindness to what was going on, led me to act by them in a way that I must always be ashamed of, and I was very foolishly tempted to say and do many things which may well lay me open to unpleasant conjectures, but I have no other reason to regret that I was not in the secret earlier.
  • Now Emma was obliged to think of the pianoforte; and the remembrance of all her former fanciful and unfair conjectures was so little pleasing, that she soon allowed herself to believe her visit had been long enough; and, with a repetition of every thing that she could venture to say of the good wishes which she really felt, took leave.

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  • She dismissed it as mere conjecture.
  • It is important to distinguish between conjecture and fact.

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