To better see all uses of the word
please enable javascript.

Used In
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • to catch and comprehend the exact truth of the whole;
  • I think you must know Hartfield enough to comprehend that.
  • —and then follows the application, which I think, my dear Harriet, you cannot find much difficulty in comprehending.
  • I never could comprehend how Mr. Weston could part with him.
  • Fortunately for him, Highbury, including Randalls in the same parish, and Donwell Abbey in the parish adjoining, the seat of Mr. Knightley, comprehended many such.
  • Mr. John Knightley looked as if he did not comprehend the pleasure, but said only, coolly, "I cannot wish to be snowed up a week at Randalls."
  • And Emma had the advantage of hearing her own silly compliment repeated twice over before the good old lady could comprehend it.
  • Her good-nature, too, is not so very slight a claim, comprehending, as it does, real, thorough sweetness of temper and manner, a very humble opinion of herself, and a great readiness to be pleased with other people.
  • "He is a person I never think of from one month’s end to another," said Mr. Knightley, with a degree of vexation, which made Emma immediately talk of something else, though she could not comprehend why he should be angry.
  • She was obliged to repeat and explain it, before it was fully comprehended; and then, being quite new, farther representations were necessary to make it acceptable.
  • If so, you must extend your suspicions and comprehend Mr.
  • I used to be quite angry with Selina; but really I begin now to comprehend that a married woman has many things to call her attention.
  • Mr. Knightley connected it with the dream; but how it could all be, was beyond his comprehension.
  • —That is a degree of placidity, which I can neither comprehend nor respect.
  • And now I can tolerably comprehend his behaviour.
  • Jane Fairfax’s perception seemed to accompany his; her comprehension was certainly more equal to the covert meaning, the superior intelligence, of those five letters so arranged.
  • —You must all endeavour to comprehend the exact nature of my situation when I first arrived at Randalls; you must consider me as having a secret which was to be kept at all hazards.
  • Harriet did think him all perfection, and maintained the non-existence of any body equal to him in person or goodness—and did, in truth, prove herself more resolutely in love than Emma had foreseen; but yet it appeared to her so natural, so inevitable to strive against an inclination of that sort unrequited, that she could not comprehend its continuing very long in equal force.
  • It was much easier to chat than to study; much pleasanter to let her imagination range and work at Harriet’s fortune, than to be labouring to enlarge her comprehension or exercise it on sober facts; and the only literary pursuit which engaged Harriet at present, the only mental provision she was making for the evening of life, was the collecting and transcribing all the riddles of every sort that she could meet with, into a thin quarto of hot-pressed paper, made up by her friend, andů
  • She was, moreover, perpetually hearing about him; for, excepting when at Hartfield, she was always among those who saw no fault in Mr. Elton, and found nothing so interesting as the discussion of his concerns; and every report, therefore, every guess—all that had already occurred, all that might occur in the arrangement of his affairs, comprehending income, servants, and furniture, was continually in agitation around her.
  • "Oh! to be sure," cried Emma, "it is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage.
  • "No," said Mr. Knightley, nearly at the same time; "you are not often deficient; not often deficient either in manner or comprehension.
  • A young woman, if she fall into bad hands, may be teazed, and kept at a distance from those she wants to be with; but one cannot comprehend a young man)s being under such restraint, as not to be able to spend a week with his father, if he likes it.
  • "Well," said she at last, trying to recover herself; "this is a circumstance which I must think of at least half a day, before I can at all comprehend it.
  • —I cannot comprehend a man’s wishing to give a woman any proof of affection which he knows she would rather dispense with; and he did know that she would have prevented the instrument’s coming if she could."

  • There are no more uses of "comprehend" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • I don’t think she comprehends how dangerous this has become.
  • Washington fails to comprehend the change in China’s strategy.

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading