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apprehensive
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Emma
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apprehensive
Used In
Emma
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  • Yes; and every delay makes one more apprehensive of other delays.
  • These feelings rapidly restored his comfort, while Mrs. Weston, of a more apprehensive disposition, foresaw nothing but a repetition of excuses and delays; and after all her concern for what her husband was to suffer, suffered a great deal more herself.
  • She was soon convinced that it was not for herself she was feeling at all apprehensive or embarrassed; it was for him.
  • Emma pondered a moment, and then replied, "I will not pretend not to understand you; and to give you all the relief in my power, be assured that no such effect has followed his attentions to me, as you are apprehensive of."
  • …vacation since their marriage had been divided between Hartfield and Donwell Abbey; but all the holidays of this autumn had been given to sea-bathing for the children, and it was therefore many months since they had been seen in a regular way by their Surry connexions, or seen at all by Mr. Woodhouse, who could not be induced to get so far as London, even for poor Isabella’s sake; and who consequently was now most nervously and apprehensively happy in forestalling this too short visit.

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  • She is apprehensive about her new job.
  • She is apprehensive about finals.

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