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David Copperfield
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Used in
David Copperfield
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  • I suppose she was to be subdued and broken to their detestable mould, Heaven help her!' said I. 'And she has been.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She had chained it up again, and however it might tear her within, she subdued it to herself.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • As they had spoken in a subdued tone, while speaking of Em'ly, I had no doubt that she was near.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It was always earnest; but when it was very earnest, as it was now, there was a thrill in it that quite subdued me.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • And now, as I close my task, subduing my desire to linger yet, these faces fade away.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • If I did her wrong; as I fear I did, in taking advantage (but I never meant it) of her gratitude and her affection; I ask pardon of that lady, in my heart!' He walked across the room, and came back to the same place; holding the chair with a grasp that trembled, like his subdued voice, in its earnestness.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • And though it is terrible to you to hear,' said Mr. Wickfield, quite subdued, 'if you knew how terrible it is for me to tell, you would feel compassion for me!' The Doctor, in the perfect goodness of his nature, put out his hand.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • So my mother suspected, at least, as she observed her by the low glimmer of the fire: too much scared by Miss Betsey, too uneasy in herself, and too subdued and bewildered altogether, to observe anything very clearly, or to know what to say.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • That the engrossing object of— HEEP — was, next to gain, to subdue Mr. and Miss W. (of his ulterior views in reference to the latter I say nothing) entirely to himself.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • So Mrs. Gummidge did it; and, I am sorry to relate, cast a damp upon the festive character of our departure, by immediately bursting into tears, and sinking subdued into the arms of Ham, with the declaration that she knowed she was a burden, and had better be carried to the House at once.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I trust,' said Mr. Micawber, solemnly, 'that my son Wilkins will ever bear in mind, that he had infinitely better put his fist in the fire, than use it to handle the serpents that have poisoned the life-blood of his unhappy parent!' Deeply affected, and changed in a moment to the image of despair, Mr. Micawber regarded the serpents with a look of gloomy abhorrence (in which his late admiration of them was not quite subdued), folded them up and put them in his pocket.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • My poor little wife was in such affliction when she thought I should be annoyed, and in such a state of joy when she found I was not, that the discomfiture I had subdued, very soon vanished, and we passed a happy evening; Dora sitting with her arm on my chair while Traddles and I discussed a glass of wine, and taking every opportunity of whispering in my ear that it was so good of me not to be a cruel, cross old boy.  (not reviewed by editor)

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as in: subdued colors
as in: subdue opposition
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