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David Copperfield
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David Copperfield
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  • I feel obliged to bear her company, when I might prefer to be alone.
  • ’Much obliged to you, Peggotty,’ returned my mother, in a cheerful voice, ’I have had a VERY pleasant evening.’
  • I am very much obliged to anybody who assists me, and I only want to be consulted as a mere form, sometimes.
  • ’I am very much obliged to you.’
  • I was obliged to consider a little before I understood what Mr. Peggotty meant by this figure, expressive of a complete circle of intelligence.
  • Then, she turned faint; and was so very ill that they were obliged to give her cherry brandy.
  • He was so fat that he was obliged to pant some time before he could say: ’That’s right.’
  • He had a hammer in his hand, and his mouth was full of little nails, which he was obliged to take out before he could speak.
  • This obliged me to run after her, and she ran so fast that we were very near the cottage before I caught her.
  • ’I am very much obliged to you,’ said my aunt; ’and so is he, I see; but —’
  • I am greatly obliged, and I should like it of all things, I assure you; but I am far too umble.
  • I took heart to tell him that I had had nothing all night, and that if he would allow me to buy something to eat, I should be very much obliged to him.
  • And I am so frightened that they are afterwards obliged to take me out of bed, and show me the quiet churchyard out of the bedroom window, with the dead all lying in their graves at rest, below the solemn moon.
  • ’Much obliged.
  • Greatly to the astonishment of the passengers in the street, as well as of her relations going on before, the good soul was obliged to stop and embrace me on the spot, with many protestations of her unalterable love.
  • At length, however, he got better, though he still panted hard, and was so exhausted that he was obliged to sit on the stool of the shop-desk.
  • ’I was obliged to announce myself, somehow,’ I replied.
  • I was obliged to confess — I felt ashamed, even of being at this disadvantage before Littimer — that Miss Mowcher and I were wholly unacquainted.
  • He told me, when I shook hands with him, that he was proud to be noticed by me, and that he really felt obliged to me for my condescension.
  • If I had been obliged to look at him with him splay foot on Mr. Wickfield’s head, I think I could scarcely have hated him more.
  • Oh, I’m so much obliged to you for this confidence!
  • She replied, ’My brother is robust, I am obliged to you.’
  • ’None, I am obliged to you, sir.’
  • I am very much obliged to you, Copperfield; but — I am afraid I have lent him that already.’
  • ’I am very much obliged to you, indeed,’ said Traddles, on hearing it was to be sent to where he lived, that night.
  • I was obliged to admit that Mr. Spenlow had considered it probable.
  • ’I am very much obliged to you, my dear Traddles!’ said I. ’I’ll begin tomorrow.’
  • I obliged myself to say that I was glad he had made his apology.
  • In the course of that letter, I told Peggotty that I had a particular occasion for half a guinea; and that if she could lend me that sum until I could repay it, I should be very much obliged to her, and would tell her afterwards what I had wanted it for.
  • I was obliged to get her to repeat it, for she spoke it the first time quite down my throat, in consequence of my having forgotten to take my mouth away from the keyhole and put my ear there; and though her words tickled me a good deal, I didn’t hear them.
  • So did I. Traddles thanked us both, by saying, with a simplicity and honesty I had sense enough to be quite charmed with, ’I am very much obliged to you indeed.
  • I was obliged to make a show of taking the hand he stretched across to me; and then, with very different emotions, I took the hand of the broken gentleman, his partner.
  • As to Miss Murdstone,’ for I had alluded to her in the letter, ’I respect that lady’s vigilance, and feel obliged to her; but she has strict charge to avoid the subject.
  • If so, it sharpened his appetite; for I distinctly call to mind that, although he had eaten a good deal of pork and greens at dinner, and had finished off with a fowl or two, he was obliged to have cold boiled bacon for tea, and disposed of a large quantity without any emotion.
  • How HE wears! and his wig too, for he’s had it these ten years — and he went on at that rate in the complimentary line, that I began to think I should be obliged to ring the bell.
  • What walks I took alone, down muddy lanes, in the bad winter weather, carrying that parlour, and Mr. and Miss Murdstone in it, everywhere: a monstrous load that I was obliged to bear, a daymare that there was no possibility of breaking in, a weight that brooded on my wits, and blunted them!
  • I listened to all this with attention; and though, I must say, I had my doubts whether the country was quite as much obliged to the Commons as Mr. Spenlow made out, I respectfully deferred to his opinion.
  • As no arguments I could urge, in my bewildered condition, had the least effect upon his modesty in inducing him to accept my bedroom, I was obliged to make the best arrangements I could, for his repose before the fire.
  • We strolled a long way, and loaded ourselves with things that we thought curious, and put some stranded starfish carefully back into the water — I hardly know enough of the race at this moment to be quite certain whether they had reason to feel obliged to us for doing so, or the reverse — and then made our way home to Mr. Peggotty’s dwelling.
  • He was got up with such care, and was so stiff, that he could hardly bend himself; being obliged, when he glanced at some papers on his desk, after sitting down in his chair, to move his whole body, from the bottom of his spine, like Punch.
  • I came out again, hotter and faster than ever, and dashed up to Highgate, at such a rate that I was there an hour too early; and, though I had not been, should have been obliged to stroll about to cool myself, before I was at all presentable.
  • They pretend that Sophy has a lock of it in her desk, and is obliged to shut it in a clasped book, to keep it down.
  • I was obliged to hurry away; I was kept out late; and I felt all night such pangs of remorse as made me miserable.
  • He was a tearful boy, and broke into such deplorable lamentations, when a cessation of our connexion was hinted at, that we were obliged to keep him.
  • ’My good sir,’ returned Mr. Micawber, ’you recall me, I am obliged to you.’
  • ’I am much obliged to you, sir,’ returned Mr. Littimer.
  • She held so tight to him, in fact, that the officers were obliged to take ’cause both together.
  • We had only one check to our pleasure, and that happened a little while before I took my leave, when, Miss Mills chancing to make some allusion to tomorrow morning, I unluckily let out that, being obliged to exert myself now, I got up at five o’clock.
  • I could have wished he had been less obliged to me, for he hovered about me in his gratitude all the rest of the evening; and whenever I said a word to Agnes, was sure, with his shadowless eyes and cadaverous face, to be looking gauntly down upon us from behind.
  • As he was obliged to leave early, on account of going away next morning for a month, I had not nearly so much conversation with him as I could have wished; but we exchanged addresses, and promised ourselves the pleasure of another meeting when he should come back to town.
  • The sand, the sea-weed, and the flakes of foam, were driving by; and I was obliged to call for assistance before I could shut the gate again, and make it fast against the wind.
  • I took that opportunity, with my voice sticking in my throat, and my sight failing as I uttered the words, to express my hope that Miss Spenlow was quite well; to which Mr. Spenlow replied, with no more emotion than if he had been speaking of an ordinary human being, that he was much obliged to me, and she was very well.
  • It was so unaccountable not to be obliged to go out to see her, not to have any occasion to be tormenting myself about her, not to have to write to her, not to be scheming and devising opportunities of being alone with her.
  • For example: the day after that on which I was obliged to appear against him, he made certain revelations touching a hamper in the cellar, which we believed to be full of wine, but which had nothing in it except bottles and corks.
  • It would have been better, as it turned out, to have led gently up to this announcement, for Mrs. Micawber, being in a delicate state of health, was overcome by it, and was taken so unwell, that Mr. Micawber was obliged, in great trepidation, to run down to the water-butt in the backyard, and draw a basinful to lave her brow with.
  • Perhaps he voted for somebody, or lent money to somebody, or bought something of somebody, or otherwise obliged somebody, or jobbed for somebody, who knew somebody who got the lieutenant of the county to nominate him for the commission.’
  • I laughed heartily at my own jokes, and everybody else’s; called Steerforth to order for not passing the wine; made several engagements to go to Oxford; announced that I meant to have a dinner-party exactly like that, once a week, until further notice; and madly took so much snuff out of Grainger’s box, that I was obliged to go into the pantry, and have a private fit of sneezing ten minutes long.
  • You must remember, I am sure, that I was obliged to go out yesterday when dinner was half over; and that, the day before, I was made quite unwell by being obliged to eat underdone veal in a hurry; today, I don’t dine at all — and I am afraid to say how long we waited for breakfast — and then the water didn’t boil.
  • You must remember, I am sure, that I was obliged to go out yesterday when dinner was half over; and that, the day before, I was made quite unwell by being obliged to eat underdone veal in a hurry; today, I don’t dine at all — and I am afraid to say how long we waited for breakfast — and then the water didn’t boil.
  • That, perhaps, it was a little unreasonable that these registrars in the receipt of profits amounting to eight or nine thousand pounds a year (to say nothing of the profits of the deputy registrars, and clerks of seats), should not be obliged to spend a little of that money, in finding a reasonably safe place for the important documents which all classes of people were compelled to hand over to them, whether they would or no. That, perhaps, it was a little unjust, that all the great…
  • …at the doorway, thinking that Miss Mowcher was a long while making her appearance, when, to my infinite astonishment, there came waddling round a sofa which stood between me and it, a pursy dwarf, of about forty or forty-five, with a very large head and face, a pair of roguish grey eyes, and such extremely little arms, that, to enable herself to lay a finger archly against her snub nose, as she ogled Steerforth, she was obliged to meet the finger half-way, and lay her nose against it.

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  • He obliged her by listening attentively.
  • They looked at me expectantly and I was obliged to comment.

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