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David Copperfield
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David Copperfield
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  • But the visit had its unforeseen consequences;
  • An aunt of my father’s, and consequently a great-aunt of mine, of whom I shall have more to relate by and by, was the principal magnate of our family.
  • But I did, and I am ready to take the consequences of it.’
  • For good, too; though, in consequence of my previous emotions, I was still occasionally seized with a stormy sob.
  • Without considering, perhaps, whether there were any consequences to be taken, I felt quite in a glow at this gallant speech.
  • I wish to set before you, honourably, the exact consequences — so far as they are within my knowledge — of your abetting him in this appeal.’
  • I heard that Mr. Creakle had turned him out of doors, in consequence; and that Mrs. and Miss Creakle had been in a sad way, ever since.
  • Now, David, you understand me, and you know what will be the consequence if you fail to obey me to the letter.’
  • But he applied that maxim to our marriage, my dear; and that was so far prematurely entered into, in consequence, that I never recovered the expense.’
  • And the natural consequence is, as anybody but a baby might have foreseen, that he prowls and wanders.
  • ’If Mr. Micawber’s creditors will not give him time,’ said Mrs. Micawber, ’they must take the consequences; and the sooner they bring it to an issue the better.
  • Consequently Mr. Micawber was soon so overcome, that he mingled his tears with hers and mine; until he begged me to do him the favour of taking a chair on the staircase, while he got her into bed.
  • ’She’s at school, sir,’ said Mr. Peggotty, wiping the heat consequent on the porterage of Peggotty’s box from his forehead; ’she’ll be home,’ looking at the Dutch clock, ’in from twenty minutes to half-an-hour’s time.
  • I have thought, since, that its assuming that character was a necessary consequence of Mr. Murdstone’s firmness, which wouldn’t allow him to let anybody off from the utmost weight of the severest penalties he could find any excuse for.
  • I know that a great many empty bottles were one of the consequences of this traffic, and that certain men and boys were employed to examine them against the light, and reject those that were flawed, and to rinse and wash them.
  • I was obliged to get her to repeat it, for she spoke it the first time quite down my throat, in consequence of my having forgotten to take my mouth away from the keyhole and put my ear there; and though her words tickled me a good deal, I didn’t hear them.
  • Consequently, I was not prepared, at seven o’clock next morning, to receive the following communication, dated half past nine in the evening; a quarter of an hour after I had left him: — ’My DEAR YOUNG FRIEND, ’The die is cast — all is over.
  • We little thought, any one of us, I dare say, when I ate my breakfast that first morning, and went to sleep under the shadow of the peacock’s feathers to the sound of the flute, what consequences would come of the introduction into those alms-houses of my insignificant person.
  • Mrs. Gummidge appeared to be fretting a little, in her old corner; and consequently looked quite natural, too.
  • Consequently, I am not so much engaged as you — in that sense.’
  • In consequence, an ill-natured story got about, that Em’ly wanted to be a lady.
  • And here I may remark, that what I underwent from Mrs. Crupp, in consequence of the tyranny she established over me, was dreadful.
  • The quantity of walking exercise I took, was not in this respect attended with its usual consequence, as the disappointment counteracted the fresh air.
  • ’I see,’ said I. ’Consequently,’ pursued Mr. Omer, ’Em’ly’s still a little down, and a little fluttered; perhaps, upon the whole, she’s more so than she was.
  • Consequently the advertisement was withdrawn at a dead loss — for as to sherry, my poor dear mother’s own sherry was in the market then — and ten years afterwards, the caul was put up in a raffle down in our part of the country, to fifty members at half-a-crown a head, the winner to spend five shillings.
  • It informed me of her husband’s hopeless state, and hinted at his being ’a little nearer’ than heretofore, and consequently more difficult to manage for his own comfort.
  • It is not an avocation of a remunerative description — in other words, it does not pay — and some temporary embarrassments of a pecuniary nature have been the consequence.
  • Mr. Omer coughed again, in consequence of laughing, and was assisted out of his fit by his daughter, who now stood close beside us, dancing her smallest child on the counter.
  • But Mr. Dick got taxed with such things in the course of his Parliamentary career, and was made responsible for such awful consequences, that he became uncomfortable in his mind sometimes.
  • Then, you know, being formed for society and admiration, and not being able to enjoy much of it in consequence of their limited means, she naturally gets a little irritable and exacting, sometimes.
  • You see the truth is,’ said Traddles, in a whisper, ’he had changed his name to Mortimer, in consequence of his temporary embarrassments; and he don’t come out till after dark — and then in spectacles.
  • He was taken ill in the night — quite prostrate he was — in consequence of Crab; and after being drugged with black draughts and blue pills, to an extent which Demple (whose father was a doctor) said was enough to undermine a horse’s constitution, received a caning and six chapters of Greek Testament for refusing to confess.
  • A certain mysterious feeling, consequent on the darkness, the secrecy of the revel, and the whisper in which everything was said, steals over me again, and I listen to all they tell me with a vague feeling of solemnity and awe, which makes me glad that they are all so near, and frightens me (though I feign to laugh) when Traddles pretends to see a ghost in the corner.
  • Mr. Micawber then embraced Mrs. Micawber, and pressed my hand; leaving me to infer from this broken allusion that his domestic supply of water had been cut off that afternoon, in consequence of default in the payment of the company’s rates.
  • But I might — I might — if this silly business were not completely relinquished altogether, be induced in some anxious moment to guard her from, and surround her with protections against, the consequences of any foolish step in the way of marriage.
  • The surprise and its consequences would have been much less disagreeable to me if he had not been penitent.
  • I have committed follies, gentlemen,’ said Uriah, looking round with a meek smile, ’and I ought to bear the consequences without repining.’
  • Consequently, the principal use to which the cookery-book was devoted, was being put down in the corner for Jip to stand upon.
  • Consequently speaking, I am not at all afraid of going wherever I may wish, sir.’
  • Next morning, consequently, we were on the Yarmouth coach, and again travelling over the old ground.
  • His papers were in a little confusion, in consequence of Mr. Jack Maldon having lately proffered his occasional services as an amanuensis, and not being accustomed to that occupation; but we should soon put right what was amiss, and go on swimmingly.
  • Words passed between us in consequence, and I felt it due to my character to leave him.
  • In consequence of which,’ Mr. Omer shook himself and his chair with laughter at the success of his device, ’she and Joram’s at a ball.’
  • The idea of their frightening her, and making her cry, and of my not being there to comfort her, was so excruciating, that it impelled me to write a wild letter to Mr. Spenlow, beseeching him not to visit upon her the consequences of my awful destiny.
  • I heard that the man with the wooden leg, whose name was Tungay, was an obstinate barbarian who had formerly assisted in the hop business, but had come into the scholastic line with Mr. Creakle, in consequence, as was supposed among the boys, of his having broken his leg in Mr. Creakle’s service, and having done a deal of dishonest work for him, and knowing his secrets.
  • I was greatly elated by these orders; but my heart smote me for my selfishness, when I witnessed their effect on Mr. Dick, who was so low-spirited at the prospect of our separation, and played so ill in consequence, that my aunt, after giving him several admonitory raps on the knuckles with her dice-box, shut up the board, and declined to play with him any more.
  • He had his old companions about him, too; for there were plenty of high trees in the neighbourhood, and two or three rooks were on the grass, looking after him, as if they had been written to about him by the Canterbury rooks, and were observing him closely in consequence.
  • CHAPTER 27 TOMMY TRADDLES It may have been in consequence of Mrs. Crupp’s advice, and, perhaps, for no better reason than because there was a certain similarity in the sound of the word skittles and Traddles, that it came into my head, next day, to go and look after Traddles.
  • CHAPTER 29 I VISIT STEERFORTH AT HIS HOME, AGAIN I mentioned to Mr. Spenlow in the morning, that I wanted leave of absence for a short time; and as I was not in the receipt of any salary, and consequently was not obnoxious to the implacable Jorkins, there was no difficulty about it.
  • I was glad to infer, from these slight premises, that Mr. Micawber was doing well; and consequently was much surprised to receive, about this time, the following letter from his amiable wife.
  • ’Do you know, Copperfield,’ said Traddles, cheerfully examining the dish, ’I think it is in consequence — they are capital oysters, but I think it is in consequence — of their never having been opened.’
  • ’Do you know, Copperfield,’ said Traddles, cheerfully examining the dish, ’I think it is in consequence — they are capital oysters, but I think it is in consequence — of their never having been opened.’
  • ’It’s a curious coincidence,’ said I. ’It is really,’ returned my host, ’quite a coincidence, that Traddles should be here at all: as Traddles was only invited this morning, when the place at table, intended to be occupied by Mrs. Henry Spiker’s brother, became vacant, in consequence of his indisposition.
  • I bought a second-hand dumb-waiter for this dinner-party, in preference to re-engaging the handy young man; against whom I had conceived a prejudice, in consequence of meeting him in the Strand, one Sunday morning, in a waistcoat remarkably like one of mine, which had been missing since the former occasion.
  • Always creeping along the ground to some small end or other, he will always magnify every object in the way; and consequently will hate and suspect everybody that comes, in the most innocent manner, between him and it.
  • If Mr. T. should ever reply to it (which I cannot but feel to be most improbable), a letter addressed to M. E., Post Office, Canterbury, will be fraught with less painful consequences than any addressed immediately to one, who subscribes herself, in extreme distress, ’Mr.
  • The changes that were rung upon dots, which in such a position meant such a thing, and in such another position something else, entirely different; the wonderful vagaries that were played by circles; the unaccountable consequences that resulted from marks like flies’ legs; the tremendous effects of a curve in a wrong place; not only troubled my waking hours, but reappeared before me in my sleep.

  • There are no more uses of "consequence" in the book.

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  • Think carefully. This is a consequential decision.
  • It is the most consequential tax legislation in decades.

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