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torment
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David Copperfield
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torment
Used In
David Copperfield
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  • The tormenting humour which was dominant there stopped them both.
  • She liked me, but she laughed at me, and tormented me; and when I went to meet her, stole home another way, and was laughing at the door when I came back, disappointed.
  • I saw him wink, solemnly, at his sister, as he rose and said, taking up the cane: ’Why, Jane, we can hardly expect Clara to bear, with perfect firmness, the worry and torment that David has occasioned her today.
  • That was the time, Mr. Murdstone, when she gave birth to her boy here,’ said my aunt; ’to the poor child you sometimes tormented her through afterwards, which is a disagreeable remembrance and makes the sight of him odious now.
  • After two days and nights, I felt as if I had lived there for a year, and yet I was not an hour older, but was quite as much tormented by my own youthfulness as ever.
  • I believe our boys were, generally, as ignorant a set as any schoolboys in existence; they were too much troubled and knocked about to learn; they could no more do that to advantage, than any one can do anything to advantage in a life of constant misfortune, torment, and worry.
  • I could not satisfy myself whether it was in her own little tormenting way, or in a maidenly reserve before us, that she kept quite close to the wall, and away from him; but I observed that she did so, all the evening.
  • I have my doubts, too, founded on the acute experience acquired at this period of my life, whether a sound enjoyment of animal food can develop itself freely in any human subject who is always in torment from tight boots.
  • At length, the steady ticking of the undisturbed clock on the wall tormented me to that degree that I resolved to go to bed.
  • If he had retorted or openly exasperated me, it would have been a relief and a justification; but he had put me on a slow fire, on which I lay tormented half the night.
  • It was so unaccountable not to be obliged to go out to see her, not to have any occasion to be tormenting myself about her, not to have to write to her, not to be scheming and devising opportunities of being alone with her.
  • ’It would be better to be this poor Peggotty, or his lout of a nephew,’ he said, getting up and leaning moodily against the chimney-piece, with his face towards the fire, ’than to be myself, twenty times richer and twenty times wiser, and be the torment to myself that I have been, in this Devil’s bark of a boat, within the last half-hour!’
  • When I got to the office, and, shutting out old Tiffey and the rest of them with my hands, sat at my desk, in my own particular nook, thinking of this earthquake that had taken place so unexpectedly, and in the bitterness of my spirit cursing Jip, I fell into such a state of torment about Dora, that I wonder I did not take up my hat and rush insanely to Norwood.

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  • She enjoys tormenting others.
  • She concealed her torment.

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