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banish
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David Copperfield
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banish
Used In
David Copperfield
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  • My cousin Annie did say, when we talked of it, that she liked to have her friends within reach rather than to have them banished, and the old Doctor —’
  • My family may consider it banishment, if they please; but I am a wife and mother, and I never will desert Mr. Micawber.’
  • Again, and again, and a hundred times again, since the night when the thought had first occurred to me and banished sleep, I had gone over that old story of my poor mother’s about my birth, which it had been one of my great delights in the old time to hear her tell, and which I knew by heart.
  • ’— if his faults cannot,’ I went on, ’be banished from your remembrance, in such an hour; look at that figure, even as one you have never seen before, and render it some help!’

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  • He was banished from his own country.
  • I tried to banish the thought from my mind.

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