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sufficient
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David Copperfield
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sufficient
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David Copperfield
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  • For these sufficient reasons I resolve to fight the butcher.
  • I have done quite sufficient for my purpose.
  • I was sufficiently ill at ease, Heaven knows; but it was not in my nature to complain much at that time of my life, so I said I was very well, and hoped he was.
  • It was sufficiently late in the year for the orchards to be ruddy with ripe apples; and in a few places the hop-pickers were already at work.
  • But morning brought with it my parting from the old house, which Agnes had filled with her influence; and that occupied my mind sufficiently.
  • Traddles still remained, perhaps, but it was very doubtful; and I had not sufficient confidence in his discretion or good luck, however strong my reliance was on his good nature, to wish to trust him with my situation.
  • DAVID COPPERFIELD by CHARLES DICKENS PREFACE TO 1850 EDITION I do not find it easy to get sufficiently far away from this Book, in the first sensations of having finished it, to refer to it with the composure which this formal heading would seem to require.
  • There was an inflexibility in her face, in her voice, in her gait and carriage, amply sufficient to account for the effect she had made upon a gentle creature like my mother; but her features were rather handsome than otherwise, though unbending and austere.
  • She had not yet sufficiently recovered from her agitation to be quite prepared for the visit we had to make.
  • Traddles imitated me in the first particular, but did not consider himself a sufficiently old friend to venture on the second.
  • It is sufficient already.
  • ’That is quite sufficient.
  • PREFACE TO THE CHARLES DICKENS EDITION I REMARKED in the original Preface to this Book, that I did not find it easy to get sufficiently far away from it, in the first sensations of having finished it, to refer to it with the composure which this formal heading would seem to require.
  • ’And then, as if this was not enough, and she had not stood sufficiently in the light of this child’s sister, Betsey Trotwood,’ said my aunt, ’she marries a second time — goes and marries a Murderer — or a man with a name like it — and stands in THIS child’s light!
  • Family circumstances are a sufficient reason for our only meeting on that footing, and it is quite unnecessary that either of us should make the other the subject of remark.
  • I knew my aunt sufficiently well to know that she had something of importance on her mind, and that there was far more matter in this arrival than a stranger might have supposed.
  • His satisfaction in which happy imposition on us, and in having preserved the impenetrable secret of the box, appeared to be a sufficient compensation to him for all his tortures.
  • ’If no member of my family,’ said Mrs. Micawber, ’is possessed of sufficient natural feeling to negotiate that bill — I believe there is a better business-term to express what I mean —’
  • In the light room, Dora blushing looked so lovely, that I could not tear myself away, but sat there staring, in a dream, until the snoring of Mr. Spenlow inspired me with sufficient consciousness to take my leave.
  • For some little time we held no conversation, Steerforth being unusually silent, and I being sufficiently engaged in wondering, within myself, when I should see the old places again, and what new changes might happen to me or them in the meanwhile.
  • I am sufficiently behind the scenes to know the worth of political life.
  • Mr. Micawber, when he was sufficiently cool, proceeded with his letter.
  • He looked at us, as if he could never feast his eyes on us sufficiently.
  • If I showed any trace of what I felt, my own sorrows were sufficient to account for it.
  • Missis Gummidge has worked like a — I doen’t know what Missis Gummidge an’t worked like,’ said Mr. Peggotty, looking at her, at a loss for a sufficiently approving simile.
  • I was completely bewildered between Mr. Spenlow and Mr. jorkins, as to which of them really was the objecting partner; but I saw with sufficient clearness that there was obduracy somewhere in the firm, and that the recovery of my aunt’s thousand pounds was out of the question.
  • The tremendous sea itself, when I could find sufficient pause to look at it, in the agitation of the blinding wind, the flying stones and sand, and the awful noise, confounded me.
  • My love was so much in my mind and it was so natural to me to confide in Peggotty, when I found her again by my side of an evening with the old set of industrial implements, busily making the tour of my wardrobe, that I imparted to her, in a sufficiently roundabout way, my great secret.
  • The proposition I originally submitted, was twelve, eighteen, and twenty-four; but I am apprehensive that such an arrangement might not allow sufficient time for the requisite amount of — Something — to turn up.
  • I will not say, at present, might he aspire to be Governor, or anything of that sort; but would there be a reasonable opening for his talents to develop themselves — that would be amply sufficient — and find their own expansion?’
  • The business had been indifferent under Mr. jorkins, before Mr. Spenlow’s time; and although it had been quickened by the infusion of new blood, and by the display which Mr. Spenlow made, still it was not established on a sufficiently strong basis to bear, without being shaken, such a blow as the sudden loss of its active manager.
  • Miss Trotwood, or Miss Betsey, as my poor mother always called her, when she sufficiently overcame her dread of this formidable personage to mention her at all (which was seldom), had been married to a husband younger than herself, who was very handsome, except in the sense of the homely adage, ’handsome is, that handsome does’ — for he was strongly suspected of having beaten Miss Betsey, and even of having once, on a disputed question of supplies, made some hasty but determinedů
  • Although I left the office at half past three, and was prowling about the place of appointment within a few minutes afterwards, the appointed time was exceeded by a full quarter of an hour, according to the clock of St. Andrew’s, Holborn, before I could muster up sufficient desperation to pull the private bell-handle let into the left-hand door-post of Mr. Waterbrook’s house.
  • To my surprise, I heard no more about it for some two or three weeks, though I was sufficiently interested in the result of his endeavours; descrying a strange gleam of good sense — I say nothing of good feeling, for that he always exhibited — in the conclusion to which he had come.
  • It is sufficient to know that the name to which I do myself the honour to refer, will ever be treasured among the muniments of our house (I allude to the archives connected with our former lodgers, preserved by Mrs. Micawber), with sentiments of personal esteem amounting to affection.
  • ’I could not receive it as a gift,’ said Mr. Micawber, full of fire and animation, ’but if a sufficient sum could be advanced, say at five per cent interest, per annum, upon my personal liability — say my notes of hand, at twelve, eighteen, and twenty-four months, respectively, to allow time for something to turn up —’
  • Micawber being now on the eve of casting off the pecuniary shackles that have so long enthralled him,’ said Mrs. Micawber, ’and of commencing a new career in a country where there is sufficient range for his abilities, — which, in my opinion, is exceedingly important; Mr. Micawber’s abilities peculiarly requiring space, — it seems to me that my family should signalize the occasion by coming forward.

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  • We have sufficient supplies.
  • Is there sufficient cause for a search warrant?

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