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David Copperfield
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David Copperfield
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  • ’My own!’ said Peggotty, with infinite compassion.
  • And now I fell into a state of neglect, which I cannot look back upon without compassion.
  • Peggotty shook her head compassionately.
  • Then Dora beat him, and pouted, and said, ’My poor beautiful flowers!’ as compassionately, I thought, as if Jip had laid hold of me.
  • The seafaring men kept apart, when those two were seen early, walking with slow steps on the beach; and stood in knots, talking compassionately among themselves.
  • They served me with the ale, though I suspect it was not the Genuine Stunning; and the landlord’s wife, opening the little half-door of the bar, and bending down, gave me my money back, and gave me a kiss that was half admiring and half compassionate, but all womanly and good, I am sure.
  • Pray Heaven that I am going away from, have compassion on my uncle!
  • He stood between them, looking on the prostrate girl with a mixture of compassion for her, and of jealousy of her holding any companionship with her whom he loved so well, which I have always remembered distinctly.
  • I have bethought me of all that gracious and compassionate history.
  • I never saw, in any painting or reality, horror and compassion so impressively blended.
  • ’But Jip,’ said Dora, looking at him with compassion, ’even little Jip!
  • ’Show me some compassion, or I shall die mad!’
  • ’I meant to say, if you have no compassion for his mother; or if his faults — you have been bitter on them —’
  • There was an obtrusive show of compassionate zeal in his voice and manner, more intolerable — at least to me — than any demeanour he could have assumed.
  • And though it is terrible to you to hear,’ said Mr. Wickfield, quite subdued, ’if you knew how terrible it is for me to tell, you would feel compassion for me!’
  • In effect, we presently heard him uttering suppressed groans of the most dismal nature, as this magpie proceeding racked him in every joint; but while Peggotty’s eyes were full of compassion for him, she said his generous impulse would do him good, and it was better not to check it.
  • At first, she seemed to wonder at the gentle compassion with which the Doctor spoke to her, and at his wish that she should have her mother with her, to relieve the dull monotony of her life.
  • He accompanied me a good part of the way; and when we parted, with a prayer for the success of this fresh effort, there was a new and thoughtful compassion in him that I was at no loss to interpret.
  • He was by nature so exceedingly compassionate of anyone who seemed to be ill at ease, and was so quick to find any such person out, that he shook hands with Mr. Micawber, at least half-a-dozen times in five minutes.
  • From my swoon, I first awoke to a consciousness of her compassionate tears, her words of hope and peace, her gentle face bending down as from a purer region nearer Heaven, over my undisciplined heart, and softening its pain.
  • There was such deep fondness for him, and gratitude to him for all his love and care, in her beautiful look; and there was such a fervent appeal to me to deal tenderly by him, even in my inmost thoughts, and to let no harsh construction find any place against him; she was, at once, so proud of him and devoted to him, yet so compassionate and sorry, and so reliant upon me to be so, too; that nothing she could have said would have expressed more to me, or moved me more.
  • We parted with great heartiness on both sides; and when I had seen Traddles to his own door, and was going home alone, I thought, among the other odd and contradictory things I mused upon, that, slippery as Mr. Micawber was, I was probably indebted to some compassionate recollection he retained of me as his boy-lodger, for never having been asked by him for money.
  • …something strange to me, even now, in the reflection that he never saw me; and something stranger yet in the shadowy remembrance that I have of my first childish associations with his white grave-stone in the churchyard, and of the indefinable compassion I used to feel for it lying out alone there in the dark night, when our little parlour was warm and bright with fire and candle, and the doors of our house were — almost cruelly, it seemed to me sometimes — bolted and locked against…
  • The grave beneath the tree, where both my parents lay — on which I had looked out, when it was my father’s only, with such curious feelings of compassion, and by which I had stood, so desolate, when it was opened to receive my pretty mother and her baby — the grave which Peggotty’s own faithful care had ever since kept neat, and made a garden of, I walked near, by the hour.
  • If he should be so compassionate as to say that you might write something for me to read — I think he would, oh, I think he would, if you would only ask him, for he always was so brave and so forgiving — tell him then (but not else), that when I hear the wind blowing at night, I feel as if it was passing angrily from seeing him and uncle, and was going up to God against me.

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  • If I see one hungry child, I feel compassion, but when I hear of a million hungry children, I’m overwhelmed and turn my mind to other things.
  • It is not enough to be compassionate. We must act. It is not enough to act. We must act with intelligence.

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