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David Copperfield
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recollect
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David Copperfield
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  • How well I recollect the wintry ride!
  • The great remembrance by which that time is marked in my mind, seems to have swallowed up all lesser recollections, and to exist alone.
  • ’Oh yes,’ I replied; I had a good memory, and I believed I recollected them very well.
  • But the twins are a great tie; and to me, with my recollections, of papa and mama, these transactions are very painful.
  • They begin to close again, and I begin to nod, as the recollection rises fresh upon me.
  • And I recollect two bursting to the opposite side of the parlour, while she was hugging me.
  • That was before he came to me, but the recollection of it is oppressive to him even now.
  • I try in vain to recall how I felt about it, and what its circumstances were; but it is not momentous in my recollection.
  • It’s not fair to abuse my confidence,’ I answered, reddening at the recollection of my blue enslaver.
  • Nor do I recollect that Mr. Murdstone laughed at all that day, except at the Sheffield joke — and that, by the by, was his own.
  • How well I recollect it, on a cold grey afternoon, with a dull sky, threatening rain!
  • Recollect! control yourself, always control yourself!
  • I turned over on my face, I recollect, to hide my trembling lip, which answered her with greater truth.
  • How well I recollect, when I became quiet, what an unnatural stillness seemed to reign through the whole house!
  • If you was writin’ to her, p’raps you’d recollect to say that Barkis was willin’; would you?’
  • ’And do you recollect them?’
  • We were left to ourselves now, and looked very blank, I recollect, on one another.
  • How well I recollect the kind of day it was!
  • If the funeral had been yesterday, I could not recollect it better.
  • Nor do I recollect its subject.
  • ’Do you recollect where you had it last, Annie?’ said her mother.
  • ’Let me see, I must recollect a bit.
  • But I recollect being conscious of his company without having noticed his coming in — and my still sitting, musing, over the coffee-room fire.
  • I am glad to recollect that when the carrier began to move, my mother ran out at the gate, and called to him to stop, that she might kiss me once more.
  • It was quiet enough to reassure me, but I have no doubt if I had seen a moderately large wave come tumbling in, I should have taken to my heels, with an awful recollection of her drowned relations.
  • ’Do you recollect the date,’ said Mr. Dick, looking earnestly at me, and taking up his pen to note it down, ’when King Charles the First had his head cut off?’
  • It touches me nearly now, although I tell it lightly, to recollect how eager I was to leave my happy home; to think how little I suspected what I did leave for ever.
  • Distinctly as I recollect her look, I cannot say of what it was expressive, I cannot even say of what it is expressive to me now, rising again before my older judgement.
  • The kind soul promised, and we both of us kissed the keyhole with the greatest affection — I patted it with my hand, I recollect, as if it had been her honest face — and parted.
  • I recollect being very much surprised by the feint everybody made, then, of not having been to sleep at all, and by the uncommon indignation with which everyone repelled the charge.
  • And now, I must confess, the recollection of what I had seen on that night when Mr. Maldon went away, first began to return upon me with a meaning it had never had, and to trouble me.
  • I recollect it was settled by general consent that India was quite a misrepresented country, and had nothing objectionable in it, but a tiger or two, and a little heat in the warm part of the day.
  • I recollect, as the wind and water began to sound fainter in my ears, putting a short clause into my prayers, petitioning that I might grow up to marry little Em’ly, and so dropping lovingly asleep.
  • I thought of him very much after I went to bed, and raised myself, I recollect, to look at him where he lay in the moonlight, with his handsome face turned up, and his head reclining easily on his arm.
  • I am glad to recollect that when the carrier’s cart was at the gate, and my mother stood there kissing me, a grateful fondness for her and for the old place I had never turned my back upon before, made me cry.
  • Ham, who had been giving me my first lesson in all-fours, was trying to recollect a scheme of telling fortunes with the dirty cards, and was printing off fishy impressions of his thumb on all the cards he turned.
  • I now approach a period of my life, which I can never lose the remembrance of, while I remember anything: and the recollection of which has often, without my invocation, come before me like a ghost, and haunted happier times.
  • Half the establishment was writhing and crying, before the day’s work began; and how much of it had writhed and cried before the day’s work was over, I am really afraid to recollect, lest I should seem to exaggerate.
  • I am lost in the recollection of this delicious interview, and the waltz, when she comes to me again, with a plain elderly gentleman who has been playing whist all night, upon her arm, and says: ’Oh! here is my bold friend!
  • Little Em’ly consenting, and allowing me to kiss her, I became desperate; informing her, I recollect, that I never could love another, and that I was prepared to shed the blood of anybody who should aspire to her affections.
  • How far my emotions were influenced by the recollections of my childhood, I don’t know.
  • The principal gentleman who officiated behind the counter, took a good deal of notice of me; and often got me, I recollect, to decline a Latin noun or adjective, or to conjugate a Latin verb, in his ear, while he transacted my business.
  • I recollect one young fellow — a tinker, I suppose, from his wallet and brazier — who had a woman with him, and who faced about and stared at me thus; and then roared to me in such a tremendous voice to come back, that I halted and looked round.
  • I tingle again from head to foot as my recollection turns that corner, and my pen shakes in my hand.
  • As to deploring her misfortunes, she appeared to have entirely lost the recollection of ever having had any.
  • No description I could give of her would do justice to my recollection of her, or to her entire deliverance of herself to her anger.
  • What! you recollect my skirmishes with Rosa, do you?’ he exclaimed with a quick look.
  • Minnie, my dear, you recollect?
  • ’I recollect her now!’ cried I, recalling one of the two girls I had seen when I first went there.
  • ’I recollect her quite well!’
  • You may not recollect it; but when a person is umble, Master Copperfield, a person treasures such things up!’
  • ’I recollect talking about it,’ said I, ’though I certainly did not think it very likely then.’
  • I recollect saying with my own lips that I was much too umble.
  • You must always recollect of Em’ly,’ said Mr. Omer, shaking his head gently, ’that she’s a most extraordinary affectionate little thing.
  • Miss Mills was copying music (I recollect, it was a new song, called ’Affection’s Dirge’), and Dora was painting flowers.
  • ’Mine, perhaps you recollect,’ said Traddles, with a serious look, ’lives down in Devonshire — one of ten.
  • An old red-brick mansion, used as a school, was in its place; and a fine old house it must have been to go to school at, as I recollect it.
  • And — yes, to be sure — you recollect Mr. Jack Maldon, Copperfield?’
  • ’I know the house of old, you recollect,’ said I, ’and will find my way upstairs.
  • It was a heavy, settled fall, I recollect, in great flakes; and it lay thick.
  • The caul was won, I recollect, by an old lady with a hand-basket, who, very reluctantly, produced from it the stipulated five shillings, all in halfpence, and twopence halfpenny short — as it took an immense time and a great waste of arithmetic, to endeavour without any effect to prove to her.
  • I recollect well how indignantly my heart beat, as I saw his crafty face, with the appropriately red light of the fire upon it, preparing for something else.
  • Do you recollect him?’
  • ’Indeed, I recollect his speaking, at that time, of a pupil younger than himself who had taken his fancy there; but your name, as you may suppose, has not lived in my memory.’
  • I besought him to think of Agnes, to connect me with Agnes, to recollect how Agnes and I had grown up together, how I honoured her and loved her, how she was his pride and joy.
  • I recollect Peggotty and I peeping out at them from my little window; I recollect how closely they seemed to be examining the sweetbriar between them, as they strolled along; and how, from being in a perfectly angelic temper, Peggotty turned cross in a moment, and brushed my hair the wrong way, excessively hard.
  • There is no doubt whatever that I was a lackadaisical young spooney; but there was a purity of heart in all this, that prevents my having quite a contemptuous recollection of it, let me laugh as I may.
  • I recollect Peggotty and I peeping out at them from my little window; I recollect how closely they seemed to be examining the sweetbriar between them, as they strolled along; and how, from being in a perfectly angelic temper, Peggotty turned cross in a moment, and brushed my hair the wrong way, excessively hard.
  • I only recollect that underneath some white covering on the bed, with a beautiful cleanliness and freshness all around it, there seemed to me to lie embodied the solemn stillness that was in the house; and that when she would have turned the cover gently back, I cried: ’Oh no! oh no!’ and held her hand.
  • This precious volume, of which I do not recollect one word, I immediately discovered and immediately applied myself to; and I never visited the house afterwards, but I kneeled on a chair, opened the casket where this gem was enshrined, spread my arms over the desk, and fell to devouring the book afresh.
  • When I awoke, the recollection that Uriah was lying in the next room, sat heavy on me like a waking nightmare; and oppressed me with a leaden dread, as if I had had some meaner quality of devil for a lodger.
  • I had a dim recollection of having seen her at the theatre, as if I had seen her in a pale magic lantern; but she appeared to remember me perfectly, and still to suspect me of being in a state of intoxication.
  • I was not long in recollecting Mrs. Steerforth’s little parlour-maid, who had formerly worn blue ribbons in her cap.
  • Annie, my dear, I am sure you must perfectly recollect that your cousin never was strong — not what can be called ROBUST, you know,’ said Mrs. Markleham, with emphasis, and looking round upon us generally, ’— from the time when my daughter and himself were children together, and walking about, arm-in-arm, the livelong day.’
  • When it was asleep again, I crept close to my mother’s side according to my old custom, broken now a long time, and sat with my arms embracing her waist, and my little red cheek on her shoulder, and once more felt her beautiful hair drooping over me — like an angel’s wing as I used to think, I recollect — and was very happy indeed.
  • There was that jumble in my thoughts and recollections, that I had lost the clear arrangement of time and distance.
  • — not for the reason you suppose; for in my heart there is not a thought, a recollection, or a hope, that any power could separate from you!’
  • Consecrate your existence to the recollection of James Steerforth’s tenderness — he would have made you his serving-man’s wife, would he not?
  • You recollect my mentioning Sarah, as the one that has something the matter with her spine?’
  • ’Do you recollect,’ said I, ’a certain wild way in which he looked out to sea, and spoke about "the end of it"?’
  • She left me Agnes, two weeks old; and the grey hair that you recollect me with, when you first came.’
  • I particularly recollect his case, from his being took by a dwarf.’
  • I sought to recollect what she had said, when I had spoken to her on that former night, of her affection needing no return.
  • I could not forget how my mother had thought that she felt her touch her pretty hair with no ungentle hand; and though it might have been altogether my mother’s fancy, and might have had no foundation whatever in fact, I made a little picture, out of it, of my terrible aunt relenting towards the girlish beauty that I recollected so well and loved so much, which softened the whole narrative.
  • ’You and your aunt will excuse me, Copperfield, if I touch upon a painful theme, as I greatly fear I shall,’ said Traddles, hesitating; ’but I think it necessary to bring it to your recollection.
  • On his release, he embraced me with the utmost fervour; and made an entry of the transaction in his pocket-book — being very particular, I recollect, about a halfpenny I inadvertently omitted from my statement of the total.
  • And O, Agnes, even out of thy true eyes, in that same time, the spirit of my child-wife looked upon me, saying it was well; and winning me, through thee, to tenderest recollections of the Blossom that had withered in its bloom!
  • She writhed into some new posture constantly: stiffening her arms, twisting them before her face, as though to shut out from her eyes the little light there was, and drooping her head, as if it were heavy with insupportable recollections.
  • How well I recollect our sitting there, talking in whispers; or their talking, and my respectfully listening, I ought rather to say; the moonlight falling a little way into the room, through the window, painting a pale window on the floor, and the greater part of us in shadow, except when Steerforth dipped a match into a phosphorus-box, when he wanted to look for anything on the board, and shed a blue glare over us that was gone directly!
  • The playground was a bare gravelled yard, open to all the back of the house and the offices; and I knew that the servants read it, and the butcher read it, and the baker read it; that everybody, in a word, who came backwards and forwards to the house, of a morning when I was ordered to walk there, read that I was to be taken care of, for I bit, I recollect that I positively began to have a dread of myself, as a kind of wild boy who did bite.
  • It was a great jest of his, I recollect, to pretend that he couldn’t keep his teeth from chattering, whenever mention was made of an Alguazill in connexion with the adventures of Gil Blas; and I remember that when Gil Blas met the captain of the robbers in Madrid, this unlucky joker counterfeited such an ague of terror, that he was overheard by Mr. Creakle, who was prowling about the passage, and handsomely flogged for disorderly conduct in the bedroom.
  • The rest of the half-year is a jumble in my recollection of the daily strife and struggle of our lives; of the waning summer and the changing season; of the frosty mornings when we were rung out of bed, and the cold, cold smell of the dark nights when we were rung into bed again; of the evening schoolroom dimly lighted and indifferently warmed, and the morning schoolroom which was nothing but a great shivering-machine; of the alternation of boiled beef with roast beef, and boiled…
  • She recollects, as if she had dreamed it, that she lay there always a-talking her own tongue, always believing as the old boat was round the next pint in the bay, and begging and imploring of ’cause to send theer and tell how she was dying, and bring back a message of forgiveness, if it was on’y a wured.
  • We parted with great heartiness on both sides; and when I had seen Traddles to his own door, and was going home alone, I thought, among the other odd and contradictory things I mused upon, that, slippery as Mr. Micawber was, I was probably indebted to some compassionate recollection he retained of me as his boy-lodger, for never having been asked by him for money.
  • I can recollect, indeed, to have speculated, at odd times, on the possibility of my not being taught any more, or cared for any more; and growing up to be a shabby, moody man, lounging an idle life away, about the village; as well as on the feasibility of my getting rid of this picture by going away somewhere, like the hero in a story, to seek my fortune: but these were transient visions, daydreams I sat looking at sometimes, as if they were faintly painted or written on the wall of my…
  • When little Em’ly grew more courageous, and talked (but still bashfully) across the fire to me, of our old wanderings upon the beach, to pick up shells and pebbles; and when I asked her if she recollected how I used to be devoted to her; and when we both laughed and reddened, casting these looks back on the pleasant old times, so unreal to look at now; he was silent and attentive, and observed us thoughtfully.
  • I did not like to leave him, under such circumstances, and we all three dined together off a beefsteak pie — which was one of the many good things for which Peggotty was famous — and which was curiously flavoured on this occasion, I recollect well, by a miscellaneous taste of tea, coffee, butter, bacon, cheese, new loaves, firewood, candles, and walnut ketchup, continually ascending from the shop.
  • Coming before me, on this particular evening that I mention, mingled with the childish recollections and later fancies, the ghosts of half-formed hopes, the broken shadows of disappointments dimly seen and understood, the blending of experience and imagination, incidental to the occupation with which my thoughts had been busy, it was more than commonly suggestive.
  • My horror of having committed a thousand offences I had forgotten, and which nothing could ever expiate — my recollection of that indelible look which Agnes had given me — the torturing impossibility of communicating with her, not knowing, Beast that I was, how she came to be in London, or where she stayed — my disgust of the very sight of the room where the revel had been held — my racking head — the smell of smoke, the sight of glasses, the impossibility of going out, or even getting…
  • …for this great work, the aprons she put on, the bibs she borrowed from the kitchen to keep off the ink, the time she took, the innumerable stoppages she made to have a laugh with Jip as if he understood it all, her conviction that her work was incomplete unless she signed her name at the end, and the way in which she would bring it to me, like a school-copy, and then, when I praised it, clasp me round the neck, are touching recollections to me, simple as they might appear to other men.
  • I was so concerned, I recollect, even for the honour of Yarmouth, that when Steerforth said, as we drove through its dark streets to the inn, that, as well as he could make out, it was a good, queer, out-of-the-way kind of hole, I was highly pleased.

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  • I think I recollect that she was away at college that year.
  • I don’t recollect her name, but I’d recognize her.

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