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prejudice
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David Copperfield
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prejudice
Used In
David Copperfield
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  • How can you reconcile it to your conscience, I wonder, to prejudice my own boy against me, or against anybody who is dear to me?
  • She was audaciously prejudiced in my favour, and quite unable to understand why I should have any misgivings, or be low-spirited about it.
  • You must not think my visit all friendly and disinterested, Trotwood, for — I am afraid I may be cruelly prejudiced — I do not like to let papa go away alone, with him.’
  • I bought a second-hand dumb-waiter for this dinner-party, in preference to re-engaging the handy young man; against whom I had conceived a prejudice, in consequence of meeting him in the Strand, one Sunday morning, in a waistcoat remarkably like one of mine, which had been missing since the former occasion.
  • I know that my aunt distressed Dora’s aunts very much, by utterly setting at naught the dignity of fly-conveyance, and walking out to Putney at extraordinary times, as shortly after breakfast or just before tea; likewise by wearing her bonnet in any manner that happened to be comfortable to her head, without at all deferring to the prejudices of civilization on that subject.

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  • The group works to eliminate racial prejudice.
  • If you don’t overcome your prejudice, you will harm yourself and others.

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