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chivalry
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David Copperfield
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chivalry
Used In
David Copperfield
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  • I do not think that the best embodiment of chivalry, the realization of the handsomest and most romantic figure ever imagined by painter, could have said this, with a more impressive and affecting dignity than the plain old Doctor did.
  • How I thought and thought about my being poor, in Mr. Spenlow’s eyes; about my not being what I thought I was, when I proposed to Dora; about the chivalrous necessity of telling Dora what my worldly condition was, and releasing her from her engagement if she thought fit; about how I should contrive to live, during the long term of my articles, when I was earning nothing; about doing something to assist my aunt, and seeing no way of doing anything; about coming down to have no money inů

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  • Don Quixote was chivalrous, but delusional.
  • It struck her that it was hopeless to look for chivalry in such a man.
    E.M. Forster  --  A Room with a View

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