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breech
in
David Copperfield
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breech
Used In
David Copperfield
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  • ’In breeches and gaiters, broad-brimmed hat, grey coat, speckled choker,’ said the waiter.
  • I looked out for Mr. Barkis, but he was not there; and instead of him a fat, short-winded, merry-looking, little old man in black, with rusty little bunches of ribbons at the knees of his breeches, black stockings, and a broad-brimmed hat, came puffing up to the coach window, and said: ’Master Copperfield?’
  • He coughed to that extent, and his breath eluded all his attempts to recover it with that obstinacy, that I fully expected to see his head go down behind the counter, and his little black breeches, with the rusty little bunches of ribbons at the knees, come quivering up in a last ineffectual struggle.
  • This waiter, who was middle-aged and spare, looked for help to a waiter of more authority — a stout, potential old man, with a double chin, in black breeches and stockings, who came out of a place like a churchwarden’s pew, at the end of the coffee-room, where he kept company with a cash-box, a Directory, a Law-list, and other books and papers.

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  • It was a difficult breech birth.
  • The rocket is breech-loaded and a two-person team can fire it six times a minute.

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