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vex
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David Copperfield
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vex
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David Copperfield
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  • ’Ah!’ said my aunt, rubbing her nose as if she were a little vexed.
  • Markleham,’ said the Doctor, ’was quite vexed about him, poor thing; so we have got him at home again; and we have bought him a little Patent place, which agrees with him much better.’
  • ’But even that is not all,’ said I. ’During the last fortnight, some new trouble has vexed her; and she has been in and out of London every day.
  • We lived much as before, in reference to our scrambling household arrangements; but I had got used to those, and Dora I was pleased to see was seldom vexed now.
  • I was not so vexed at losing Agnes as I might have been, since it gave me an opportunity of making myself known to Traddles on the stairs, who greeted me with great fervour; while Uriah writhed with such obtrusive satisfaction and self-abasement, that I could gladly have pitched him over the banisters.
  • It was autumn, when there were no debates to vex the evening air; and I remember how the leaves smelt like our garden at Blunderstone as we trod them under foot, and how the old, unhappy feeling, seemed to go by, on the sighing wind.
  • After severely comparing one with another, and making entries on the tablets, and blotting them out, and counting all the fingers of her left hand over and over again, backwards and forwards, she would be so vexed and discouraged, and would look so unhappy, that it gave me pain to see her bright face clouded — and for me!

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  • It is a vexing problem.
  • the chronic diseases which vex mankind

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