To better see all uses of the word
remuneration
in
David Copperfield
please enable javascript.

remuneration
Used In
David Copperfield
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • For corn,’ said Mrs. Micawber argumentatively, ’as I have repeatedly said to Mr. Micawber, may be gentlemanly, but it is not remunerative.
  • Commission to the extent of two and ninepence in a fortnight cannot, however limited our ideas, be considered remunerative.’
  • It is not an avocation of a remunerative description — in other words, it does not pay — and some temporary embarrassments of a pecuniary nature have been the consequence.
  • My friend Heep has not fixed the positive remuneration at too high a figure, but he has made a great deal, in the way of extrication from the pressure of pecuniary difficulties, contingent on the value of my services; and on the value of those services I pin my faith.
  • It appears to me, that what Mr. Micawber has to do, in justice to himself, in justice to his family, and I will even go so far as to say in justice to society, by which he has been hitherto overlooked, is to advertise in all the papers; to describe himself plainly as so-and-so, with such and such qualifications and to put it thus: "Now employ me, on remunerative terms, and address, post-paid, to W. M., Post Office, Camden Town."

  • There are no more uses of "remuneration" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • It was inadequate remuneration to make up for his expenses.
  • Our policy is that employees cannot dispense "special" favors or privileges to anyone, even when there is no remuneration in return.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading