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oblivious
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David Copperfield
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oblivious
Used In
David Copperfield
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  • How often, at hare and hounds, have I seen him mounted on a little knoll, cheering the whole field on to action, and waving his hat above his grey head, oblivious of King Charles the Martyr’s head, and all belonging to it!
  • Altogether I was lost in amazement, and sat staring at her, quite oblivious, I am afraid, of the laws of politeness.
  • Remonstrance was of no use, then; so I laughed, and admired, and was very much in love and very happy; and she showed me Jip’s new trick of standing on his hind legs in a corner — which he did for about the space of a flash of lightning, and then fell down — and I don’t know how long I should have stayed there, oblivious of Traddles, if Miss Lavinia had not come in to take me away.

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  • She is oblivious to the dangers.
  • She’s a happy girl—oblivious to most of the unhappiness around her.

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