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David Copperfield
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David Copperfield
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  • Not to meander myself, at present, I will go back to my birth.
  • She always returned, with greater emphasis and with an instinctive knowledge of the strength of her objection, ’Let us have no meandering.’
  • I have understood that it was, to the last, her proudest boast, that she never had been on the water in her life, except upon a bridge; and that over her tea (to which she was extremely partial) she, to the last, expressed her indignation at the impiety of mariners and others, who had the presumption to go ’meandering’ about the world.
  • I might have a misgiving that I am ’meandering’ in stopping to say this, but that it brings me to remark that I build these conclusions, in part upon my own experience of myself; and if it should appear from anything I may set down in this narrative that I was a child of close observation, or that as a man I have a strong memory of my childhood, I undoubtedly lay claim to both of these characteristics.

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  • The path meanders through the vineyards.
  • Her journey back was rather a meander than a march.
    Hardy, Thomas  --  Tess of the d’Urbervilles - A Pure Woman

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