To better see all uses of the word
David Copperfield
please enable javascript.

Used In
David Copperfield
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • ’Peggotty!’ repeated Miss Betsey, with some indignation.
  • I recollect being very much surprised by the feint everybody made, then, of not having been to sleep at all, and by the uncommon indignation with which everyone repelled the charge.
  • Janet had gone away to get the bath ready, when my aunt, to my great alarm, became in one moment rigid with indignation, and had hardly voice to cry out, ’Janet!
  • What are my agony and indignation next day, when I hear a flying rumour that the Misses Nettingall have stood Miss Shepherd in the stocks for turning in her toes!
  • ’Don’t look at him!’ said my aunt, as I turned my head indignantly, ’but get me a coach, my dear, and wait for me in St. Paul’s Churchyard.’
  • I cried, indignantly.
  • I recollect well how indignantly my heart beat, as I saw his crafty face, with the appropriately red light of the fire upon it, preparing for something else.
  • ’He was a brute to you, Traddles,’ said I, indignantly; for his good humour made me feel as if I had seen him beaten but yesterday.
  • I was about indignantly to give my assertion the confirmation he required, when he caught hold of my hand, and gave it a squeeze.
  • Good God!’ said my aunt, with great indignation, ’I am not going to be serpentined and corkscrewed out of my senses!’
  • I exclaimed indignantly.
  • I said indignantly.
  • Then I was being ushered into one of these boxes, and found myself saying something as I sat down, and people about me crying ’Silence!’ to somebody, and ladies casting indignant glances at me, and — what! yes!
  • I have understood that it was, to the last, her proudest boast, that she never had been on the water in her life, except upon a bridge; and that over her tea (to which she was extremely partial) she, to the last, expressed her indignation at the impiety of mariners and others, who had the presumption to go ’meandering’ about the world.
  • But the interruption, and the disorder she was thrown into by the struggle outside, put an end to all softer ideas for the present, and kept my aunt indignantly declaiming to Mr. Dick about her determination to appeal for redress to the laws of her country, and to bring actions for trespass against the whole donkey proprietorship of Dover, until tea-time.
  • Mr. Heep was rather abashed, as most people might have been, by this explosion; which derived great additional force from the indignant manner in which my aunt afterwards moved in her chair, and shook her head as if she were making snaps or bounces at him.
  • Mrs. Crupp had indignantly assured him that there wasn’t room to swing a cat there; but, as Mr. Dick justly observed to me, sitting down on the foot of the bed, nursing his leg, ’You know, Trotwood, I don’t want to swing a cat.
  • In spite of himself, he appeared abashed by my aunt’s indignant tears, and came slouching out of the garden.
  • ’I think the better of her for it,’ said I, indignantly.
  • ’Any lover,’ said I. ’A score,’ cried my aunt, with a kind of indignant pride.
  • Several indignant glances directed at me.
  • I don’t think I had any definite idea where Dora came from, or in what degree she was related to a higher order of beings; but I am quite sure I should have scouted the notion of her being simply human, like any other young lady, with indignation and contempt.
  • Though she was just as sharp that day as on the day before, and was in and out about the donkeys just as often, and was thrown into a tremendous state of indignation, when a young man, going by, ogled Janet at a window (which was one of the gravest misdemeanours that could be committed against my aunt’s dignity), she seemed to me to command more of my respect, if not less of my fear.
  • I am sure when I think of the fellow now, my blood rises against him with the disinterested indignation I should feel if I could have known all about him without having ever been in his power; but it rises hotly, because I know him to have been an incapable brute, who had no more right to be possessed of the great trust he held, than to be Lord High Admiral, or Commander-in-Chief — in either of which capacities it is probable that he would have done infinitely less mischief.
  • Mrs. Markleham, by this time recovering the power of speech, and seeming to swell with family pride and motherly indignation, here exclaimed, ’Annie, get up immediately, and don’t disgrace everybody belonging to you by humbling yourself like that, unless you wish to see me go out of my mind on the spot!’
  • If anyone had told me, then, that all this was a brilliant game, played for the excitement of the moment, for the employment of high spirits, in the thoughtless love of superiority, in a mere wasteful careless course of winning what was worthless to him, and next minute thrown away — I say, if anyone had told me such a lie that night, I wonder in what manner of receiving it my indignation would have found a vent!
  • A murmur, partly of gratification at Twenty Seven’s celestial state of mind, and partly of indignation against the Contractor who had given him any cause of complaint (a note of which was immediately made by Mr. Creakle), having subsided, Twenty Seven stood in the midst of us, as if he felt himself the principal object of merit in a highly meritorious museum.
  • (’Which you haven’t, you Marplot,’ observed my aunt, in an indignant whisper.

  • There are no more uses of "indignant" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • She was indignant, but agreed to be searched when they accused her of shoplifting.
  • "I am not a fool," she said indignantly.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading