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heed
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David Copperfield
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heed
Used In
David Copperfield
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  • Mr. Murdstone took no heed of me when I went into the parlour where he was, but sat by the fireside, weeping silently, and pondering in his elbow-chair.
  • Twice I called him by his name, in the tone in which I might have tried to rouse a sleeper, before he heeded me.
  • My aunt, without appearing to take much heed of me, put on a coarse apron with a bib, which she took out of the press; washed up the teacups with her own hands; and, when everything was washed and set in the tray again, and the cloth folded and put on the top of the whole, rang for Janet to remove it.
  • If you had been more mindful of yourself, and less of me, when we grew up here together, I think my heedless fancy never would have wandered from you.
  • She heeded no more what they said, than if she had had no ears.
  • I was too attentive to the Doctor and his wife, to give any heed to this request; and it made no impression on anybody else; so Mrs. Markleham panted, stared, and fanned herself.
  • ’I speak,’ she said, not deigning to take any heed of this appeal, and drawing away her dress from the contamination of Emily’s touch, ’I speak of HIS home — where I live.

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  • Heed the advice of the old women.
  • She did not heed his warning.

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