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haggard
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David Copperfield
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haggard
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David Copperfield
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  • ’Yes; and the sense of being unfit for it, or of not having understood it, or of having shown his condition in spite of himself, seems to make him so uneasy, that next day he is worse, and next day worse, and so he becomes jaded and haggard.
  • She was lightly dressed; looked bold, and haggard, and flaunting, and poor; but seemed, for the time, to have given all that to the wind which was blowing, and to have nothing in her mind but going after them.
  • I saw her haggard, listening face distinctly.
  • I observed, upon that closer opportunity of observation, that she was worn and haggard, and that her sunken eyes expressed privation and endurance.
  • I got up, several times, and looked out; but could see nothing, except the reflection in the window-panes of the faint candle I had left burning, and of my own haggard face looking in at me from the black void.

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  • Rogak had Melody Byrd read a passage: Circe trying to bewitch Odysseus: "Wow you are burnt-out husks, your spirits haggard, sere, always brooding over your wanderings long and hard, your hearts never lifting with any joy— you’ve suffered far too much.
    Laurie Halse Anderson  --  The Impossible Knife of Memory
  • Their faces were pale and haggard, scratched and bruised.
    James Dashner  --  The Death Cure

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