To better see all uses of the word
grievous
in
David Copperfield
please enable javascript.

grievous
Used In
David Copperfield
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • ’I am sure,’ my poor mother went on, at a grievous disadvantage, and with many tears, ’I don’t want anybody to go.
  • But these solemn lessons which succeeded those, I remember as the death-blow of my peace, and a grievous daily drudgery and misery.
  • And she evidently thought so, for she wept most grievously.
  • My object, when the contest within myself between stipend and no stipend, baker and no baker, existence and non-existence, ceased, was to take advantage of my opportunities to discover and expose the major malpractices committed, to that gentleman’s grievous wrong and injury, by — HEEP.
  • The picture I had before me, of the beautiful little treasure of my heart, sobbing and crying all night — of her being alone, frightened, and wretched, then — of her having so piteously begged and prayed that stony-hearted woman to forgive her — of her having vainly offered her those kisses, work-boxes, and trinkets — of her being in such grievous distress, and all for me — very much impaired the little dignity I had been able to muster.

  • There are no more uses of "grievous" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • She suffered grievous bodily harm.
  • a grievous offense against morality

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading