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David Copperfield
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David Copperfield
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  • ’We’ll say I don’t understand the boy, Clara,’ returned Miss Murdstone, arranging the little fetters on her wrists.
  • I will not say what consideration I might give to that point myself, Mr. Copperfield, if I were unfettered.
  • I sank down in a chair, and tried to utter some reply; but my tongue was fettered, and my sight was weak.
  • ’At the same time, I was going to say, if it had been my lot to have my hands unfettered — if I had not a partner — Mr. Jorkins —’
  • As for me, every word was a new heap of fetters, riveted above the last.
  • These reminded me, in reference to Miss Murdstone’s nature, of the fetters over a jail door; suggesting on the outside, to all beholders, what was to be expected within.
  • Then, just touching the back of my hand with the tips of her cold, stiff fingers, she walked away, arranging the little fetters on her wrists and round her neck; which seemed to be the same set, in exactly the same state, as when I had seen her last.
  • Having uttered which, with great distinctness, she begged the favour of being shown to her room, which became to me from that time forth a place of awe and dread, wherein the two black boxes were never seen open or known to be left unlocked, and where (for I peeped in once or twice when she was out) numerous little steel fetters and rivets, with which Miss Murdstone embellished herself when she was dressed, generally hung upon the looking-glass in formidable array.

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  • She is fettered by old ideas whose time has passed.
  • the law would fetter the free press

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