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emigrate
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David Copperfield
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emigrate
Used In
David Copperfield
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  • Micawber, I wonder you have never turned your thoughts to emigration.’
  • ’They will emigrate together, aunt,’ said I. ’Yes!’ said Mr. Peggotty, with a hopeful smile.
  • The time drawing on rapidly for the sailing of the emigrant-ship, my good old nurse (almost broken-hearted for me, when we first met) came up to London.
  • ’Pray, have you thought about that emigration proposal of mine?’
  • CHAPTER 57 THE EMIGRANTS One thing more, I had to do, before yielding myself to the shock of these emotions.
  • ’Why, what a thing it would be for yourselves and your family, Mr. and Mrs. Micawber, if you were to emigrate now.’
  • ’We have been discussing your emigration, with many apologies to you for keeping you out of the room so long; and I’ll tell you what arrangements we propose.’
  • The family, as emigrants, being objects of some interest in and about Hungerford, attracted so many beholders, that we were glad to take refuge in their room.
  • When this was done, my aunt and Agnes rose, and parted from the emigrants.
  • The ground now covering all that could perish of my departed wife, I waited only for what Mr. Micawber called the ’final pulverization of Heep’; and for the departure of the emigrants.
  • Three years had elapsed since the sailing of the emigrant ship; when, at that same hour of sunset, and in the same place, I stood on the deck of the packet vessel that brought me home, looking on the rosy water where I had seen the image of that ship reflected.
  • Among the great beams, bulks, and ringbolts of the ship, and the emigrant-berths, and chests, and bundles, and barrels, and heaps of miscellaneous baggage —’lighted up, here and there, by dangling lanterns; and elsewhere by the yellow daylight straying down a windsail or a hatchway — were crowded groups of people, making new friendships, taking leave of one another, talking, laughing, crying, eating and drinking; some, already settled down into the possession of their few feet of…
  • How the emigrants never wrote home, otherwise than cheerfully and hopefully; how Mr. Micawber had actually remitted divers small sums of money, on account of those ’pecuniary liabilities’, in reference to which he had been so business-like as between man and man; how Janet, returning into my aunt’s service when she came back to Dover, had finally carried out her renunciation of mankind by entering into wedlock with a thriving tavern-keeper; and how my aunt had finally set her seal on…

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  • Many people had to emigrate during the Nazi period
  • We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here.
    Thomas Jefferson et al.  --  The Declaration of Independence

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