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disdain
in
David Copperfield
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disdain
Used In
David Copperfield
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  • We had parted angrily on the last occasion; and there was an air of disdain about her, which she took no pains to conceal.
  • ’His feelings?’ repeated Steerforth disdainfully.
  • Miss Murdstone shut her eyes, and disdainfully inclined her head; then, slowly opening her eyes, resumed: ’David Copperfield, I shall not attempt to disguise the fact, that I formed an unfavourable opinion of you in your childhood.
  • I repeated disdainfully.
  • Miss Dartle turned her head disdainfully towards him.
  • ’The fool himself— and lives there now,’ said Uriah, disdainfully.
  • ’On my return to Norwood, after the period of absence occasioned by my brother’s marriage,’ pursued Miss Murdstone in a disdainful voice, ’and on the return of Miss Spenlow from her visit to her friend Miss Mills, I imagined that the manner of Miss Spenlow gave me greater occasion for suspicion than before.

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  • She tries to be polite, but cannot hide her disdain for authority.
  • She has nothing but disdain for the notion that common people can regulate their own lives better than she can.

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