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David Copperfield
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David Copperfield
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  • I felt more miserable and destitute than I had done at any period of my running away.
  • Then, in the privacy of my own little cabin, she informed me that Ham and Em’ly were an orphan nephew and niece, whom my host had at different times adopted in their childhood, when they were left destitute: and that Mrs. Gummidge was the widow of his partner in a boat, who had died very poor.
  • At length I was moving quietly towards the door, with the intention of saying that perhaps I should consult his feelings best by withdrawing: when he said, with his hands in his coat pockets, into which it was as much as he could do to get them; and with what I should call, upon the whole, a decidedly pious air: ’You are probably aware, Mr. Copperfield, that I am not altogether destitute of worldly possessions, and that my daughter is my nearest and dearest relative?’

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  • The article is entitled Destitute and Desperate in the Land of Plenty.
  • The worst solitude is to be destitute of sincere friendship.
    Sir Francis Bacon

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