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deplore
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David Copperfield
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deplore
Used In
David Copperfield
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  • As to deploring her misfortunes, she appeared to have entirely lost the recollection of ever having had any.
  • I deplored the untimely death of Mr. Spenlow, most sincerely, and shed tears in doing so.
  • Differences between relations are much to be deplored — but they are extremely general — and the great thing is, to be on the right side’: meaning, I take it, on the side of the moneyed interest.
  • There will be a deplorable scene, whenever we are married.
  • He was a tearful boy, and broke into such deplorable lamentations, when a cessation of our connexion was hinted at, that we were obliged to keep him.
  • ’And very much to be deplored it was, on all accounts!
  • CHAPTER 25 GOOD AND BAD ANGELS I was going out at my door on the morning after that deplorable day of headache, sickness, and repentance, with an odd confusion in my mind relative to the date of my dinner-party, as if a body of Titans had taken an enormous lever and pushed the day before yesterday some months back, when I saw a ticket-porter coming upstairs, with a letter in his hand.

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  • We deplore the government’s treatment of political prisoners.
  • I deplore this hostile action

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