To better see all uses of the word
contrite
in
David Copperfield
please enable javascript.

contrite
Used In
David Copperfield
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • ’My part in them,’ said Mr. Wickfield, shaking his white head, ’has much matter for regret — for deep regret, and deep contrition, Trotwood, you well know.
  • For myself, I felt so much self-reproach and contrition for my part in what had happened, that nothing would have enabled me to keep back my tears but the fear that Steerforth, who often looked at me, I saw, might think it unfriendly — or, I should rather say, considering our relative ages, and the feeling with which I regarded him, undutiful — if I showed the emotion which distressed me.
  • I found them to be the perfect isolation of prisoners — so that no one man in confinement there, knew anything about another; and the reduction of prisoners to a wholesome state of mind, leading to sincere contrition and repentance.

  • There are no more uses of "contrite" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • She apologized, but didn’t seem genuinely contrite.
  • Even after the jury found her guilty, she showed no sign of contrition.

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading