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audacious
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David Copperfield
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audacious
Used In
David Copperfield
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  • ’And nice people they were, who had the audacity to call him mad,’ pursued my aunt.
  • She was audaciously prejudiced in my favour, and quite unable to understand why I should have any misgivings, or be low-spirited about it.
  • ’If there is any Donkey in Dover, whose audacity it is harder to me to bear than another’s, that,’ said my aunt, striking the table, ’is the animal!’
  • They went away by one of the London night coaches, and I know no more about him; except that his malevolence to me at parting was audacious.
  • I came down again to my dinner; and even the slow comfort of the meal, and the orderly silence of the place — which was bare of guests, the Long Vacation not yet being over — were eloquent on the audacity of Traddles, and his small hopes of a livelihood for twenty years to come.

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  • It was an audacious act of piracy.
  • She had the audacity to tell me I am not good enough for him.

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