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direct
Used In
Bleak House
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unspecified meaning
  • I don’t know that it’s of any direct use my doing so, but it’s all I can do, and I do it thoroughly.
  • The gentleman in the bag wig opened the door almost directly and requested Mr. Kenge to come in.

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  • I was directing the new circulars till two this morning.
  • She answered for herself directly.
  • All the Dedlocks, in the direct male line, through a course of time during and beyond which the memory of man goeth not to the contrary, have had the gout.
  • Mr. Jarndyce directed his eyes to where he was sitting as I have just described him.
  • I was directed to his lodging—a miserable, poverty-stricken place —and I found him dead.
  • It was the room with the dark door to which Miss Flite had secretly directed my attention when I was last in the house.
  • We said as little as we could to Mr. Jarndyce, but the wind changed directly.
  • She answered for herself directly, though he had put the question in a whisper.

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  • It shall be here directly.
  • The latter part of the proposal is so directly to the purpose that Mr. Jobling says with emotion, "Guppy, my trump, your fist!"
  • First, I was not quite unconscious of the contrast in respect of meaning and intention between the silent look directed that way and the flow of words that had preceded it.
  • It smoked to that degree, in short, that we all sat coughing and crying with the windows open for half an hour, during which Mrs. Jellyby, with the same sweetness of temper, directed letters about Africa.
  • "I cannot consent to hear another word, sir," I returned, "Unless you get up from the carpet directly and go and sit down at the table as you ought to do if you have any sense at all."
  • Ada tenderly embraced him, and Richard heartily shook hands with him, and then the cousins went out of the room, looking back again directly, though, to say that they would wait for me.
  • She was in town, but not at home, having gone to Mile End directly after breakfast on some Borrioboolan business, arising out of a society called the East London Branch Aid Ramification.
  • I felt this to be true; though if I may venture to mention what I thought besides, I thought it much to be regretted that Richard’s education had not counteracted those influences or directed his character.
  • Sir Leicester directs his majestic glance down one side of the long drawing-room and up the other before he can believe that he is awake.
  • Judy, see directly to the pipe and the glass of cold brandy-and-water for Mr. George.
  • Carstone will be here directly.
  • I was on my guard for a blow, he was that passionate; but he received it in very good part and left off directly.
  • Mr. Chadband, leaning forward over the table, pierces what he has got to follow directly into Mr. Snagsby with the thumb-nail already mentioned.
  • Mr. Tulkinghorn is not within at the present moment but will be back directly.
  • Ma and Africa, together, upset the whole house directly.
  • They came out with me directly to look at the boy.
  • Her bright quick eye catches the truth directly.
  • "Charley," said I, "take your flowers home, and I will follow you directly."
  • He was away directly, in his heat and hurry, and was soon lost in the dusk of evening.
  • Charley directed the operations and went to and fro between the loft-room and the house with such little stimulants and comforts as we thought it safe to give him.
  • Old Square, Lincoln’s Inn Madam, Jarndyce and Jarndyce Our clt Mr. Jarndyce being abt to rece into his house, under an Order of the Ct of Chy, a Ward of the Ct in this cause, for whom he wishes to secure an elgble compn, directs us to inform you that he will be glad of your serces in the afsd capacity.
  • Sir Leicester is particularly complacent because he has found in his newspaper some congenial remarks bearing directly on the floodgates and the framework of society.
  • Mr. Bagnet, stopping to take a farewell look into the parlour, replies with one shake of his head directed at the interior, "If my old girl had been here—I’d have told him!"
  • Now, Nimrod being as dead as the mighty hunter whose name Mrs. Snagsby has appropriated, and the lady being unproducible, she directs her mental eye, for the present, with redoubled vigilance to the boy.
  • With this apology, Mercury directs a scornful and indignant look at the young man of the name of Guppy which plainly says, "What do you come calling here for and getting ME into a row?"
  • "In reference," proceeds the Chancellor with extra distinctness, "to the young girl and boy, the two young people"—Mr. Tangle crushed— "whom I directed to be in attendance to-day and who are now in my private room, I will see them and satisfy myself as to the expediency of making the order for their residing with their uncle."
  • In the midst of his perfect assumption of indifference, he directs a sharp look at the trooper, taking care to stand with his own back to the light and to have the other with his face towards it.
  • As the dear old infant would be with us directly, he begged that I would make an appointment for the morning, when he might set himself right through the means of an unreserved conversation with me.
  • Mr. George directed another succession of quick bright glances at me as my guardian and I exchanged a word or two of surprise at the coincidence, and I therefore explained to him how we knew the name.
  • To one of the little shops in this street, which is a musician’s shop, having a few fiddles in the window, and some Pan’s pipes and a tambourine, and a triangle, and certain elongated scraps of music, Mr. George directs his massive tread.
  • Lady Dedlock, the wall-chalking and the street-crying would come on directly, and you are to remember that it would not affect you merely (whom I cannot at all consider in this business) but your husband, Lady Dedlock, your husband.
  • On such an afternoon, if ever, the Lord High Chancellor ought to be sitting here—as here he is—with a foggy glory round his head, softly fenced in with crimson cloth and curtains, addressed by a large advocate with great whiskers, a little voice, and an interminable brief, and outwardly directing his contemplation to the lantern in the roof, where he can see nothing but fog.
  • Directing the pitching of the chair in an affable and easy manner, Mr. Bucket dismisses the Mercuries and locks the door again.
  • Whenever I saw him directing the driver, I was prepared for our descending into a deeper complication of such streets, and we never failed to do so.
  • They were all occupied with the poor girl, and I heard Mr. Woodcourt directing them and speaking to her often.
  • Open the one directed to yourself, which I stopped this very morning, and read the three words ’Lady Dedlock, Murderess’ in it.
  • The steadiness and confidence with which he had directed our journey back I could not account for.
  • Folded roughly like a letter, and directed to me at my guardian’s.
  • He knows of no direct bodily illness that he has; on the contrary, he believes that he has none.
  • These objects lie directly within his range.
  • My guardian said directly he would go too.
  • Although he squared himself again directly, he expressed a great amount of natural emotion by these simple means.
  • CHAPTER LVII Esther’s Narrative I had gone to bed and fallen asleep when my guardian knocked at the door of my room and begged me to get up directly.
  • Of course I got out directly and took his arm.
  • I don’t care about it, I don’t know about it, I don’t want it, I don’t keep it—it goes away from me directly.
  • We left home directly after breakfast to be at Westminster Hall in good time and walked down there through the lively streets—so happily and strangely it seemed!
  • If you remember anything so unimportant—which is not to be expected—you would recollect that my first thought in the affair was directly opposed to her remaining here.
  • Bring him directly.
  • The system which had addressed him in exactly the same manner as it had addressed hundreds of other boys, all varying in character and capacity, had enabled him to dash through his tasks, always with fair credit and often with distinction, but in a fitful, dazzling way that had confirmed his reliance on those very qualities in himself which it had been most desirable to direct and train.
  • He had been to call upon the dear old infant—so he called Mr. Skimpole—and the dear old infant had told him where we were, and he had told the dear old infant he was bent on coming to see us, and the dear old infant had directly wanted to come too; and so he had brought him.
  • In a very little time Mr. Jarndyce comes down and tells him that Miss Summerson will join him directly and place herself under his protection to accompany him where he pleases.
  • "As if you had anything to make you unhappy, instead of everything to make you happy, you ungrateful heart!" said I. If I could have made myself go to sleep, I would have done it directly, but not being able to do that, I took out of my basket some ornamental work for our house (I mean Bleak House) that I was busy with at that time and sat down to it with great determination.
  • When my darling heard my footsteps, she came out into the small passage and threw her arms round my neck, but she composed herself directly and said that Richard had asked for me several times.
  • And sometimes I thought you ought to know it directly, and sometimes I thought you ought not to know it and keep it from my cousin John; and I could not tell what to do, and I fretted very much.
  • With a glance upward at the dimly lighted windows of Sir Leicester’s room, he sets off, full-swing, to the nearest coachstand, picks out the horse for his money, and directs to be driven to the shooting gallery.
  • He is no great scribe, rather handling his pen like the pocket-staff he carries about with him always convenient to his grasp, and discourages correspondence with himself in others as being too artless and direct a way of doing delicate business.
  • Caddy was quite transported by this reply of mine, being, I believe, as susceptible to the least kindness or encouragement as any tender heart that ever beat in this world; and after another turn or two round the garden, during which she put on an entirely new pair of gloves and made herself as resplendent as possible that she might do no avoidable discredit to the Master of Deportment, we went to Newman Street direct.
  • Further conversation is prevented, for the time, by the necessity under which Mr. Bagnet finds himself of directing the whole force of his mind to the dinner, which is a little endangered by the dry humour of the fowls in not yielding any gravy, and also by the made gravy acquiring no flavour and turning out of a flaxen complexion.
  • Skimpole reasons with himself, this is a tamed lynx, an active police-officer, an intelligent man, a person of a peculiarly directed energy and great subtlety both of conception and execution, who discovers our friends and enemies for us when they run away, recovers our property for us when we are robbed, avenges us comfortably when we are murdered.
  • We arrived at such a capital understanding that when he was jogging with me lazily, and rather obstinately, down some shady lane, if I patted his neck and said, "Stubbs, I am surprised you don’t canter when you know how much I like it; and I think you might oblige me, for you are only getting stupid and going to sleep," he would give his head a comical shake or two and set off directly, while Charley would stand still and laugh with such enjoyment that her laughter was like music.
  • He has bought two specimens of poultry, which, if there be any truth in adages, were certainly not caught with chaff, to be prepared for the spit; he has amazed and rejoiced the family by their unlooked-for production; he is himself directing the roasting of the poultry; and Mrs. Bagnet, with her wholesome brown fingers itching to prevent what she sees going wrong, sits in her gown of ceremony, an honoured guest.
  • "Why, cousin John," said Ada, clasping her hands upon his arm and shaking her head at me across him—for I wanted her to be quiet— "Esther was their friend directly.
  • "If I find a person unwilling to hear what I have to say, I tell that person directly, ’I am incapable of fatigue, my good friend, I am never tired, and I mean to go on until I have done.’
  • But our direct road lies through Sir Leicester Dedlock’s park, and in that fellow’s property I have sworn never to set foot of mine, or horse’s foot of mine, pending the present relations between us, while I breathe the breath of life!"
  • "I am aware," said Mr. Guppy, leaning forward over the tray and regarding me, as I again strangely felt, though my eyes were not directed to him, with his late intent look, "I am aware that in a worldly point of view, according to all appearances, my offer is a poor one.
  • I have some business there that must be looked to directly," Mrs. Rouncewell answers.

  • There are no more uses of "direct" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: walked directly to work Define
proceeding without interruption in the straightest or quickest possible manner
as in: directly above; or buy direct from Define
straight (exactly where stated; or without anything in between)
as in: was direct in my instructions Define
straightforward (clear and explicit -- perhaps also indicating openness and honesty)
as in: directed her question to Define
aim or focus
as in: directed the jury to... Define
give instructions or commands (directions that must be followed)
as in: directed the movie Define
supervise or administer (often while giving directions or orders)
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