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apprehension
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Bleak House
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apprehension
Used In
Bleak House
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unspecified meaning
  • And Mr. Smallweed says it not without evident apprehensions of his dear friend, who still stands over him looming larger than ever.
  • "Shall I tell her?" said I. "Would you be so good?" he returned with a glance of something like apprehension at Miss Flite.

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  • I never saw such faltering, such confusion, such amazement and apprehension.
  • The stationer’s heart begins to thump heavily, for his old apprehensions have never abated.
  • Now, Sir Leicester Dedlock, Baronet, don’t you be nervous on account of the apprehension at present coming off.
  • I did it all so quietly because I was not quite free from my old apprehension that Ada would be rather sorry and because my guardian was so quiet himself.
  • Nor in his apprehension, on the surface of things, without some reason, for Phil, who has never beheld the apparition in the black-velvet cap before, has stopped short with a gun in his hand with much of the air of a dead shot intent on picking Mr. Smallweed off as an ugly old bird of the crow species.
  • This corroborated the apprehensions I had formed, when he began to look at direction-posts, and to leave the carriage at cross roads for a quarter of an hour at a time while he explored them.
  • This troubled Prince a good deal, not because he had the least doubt about it, but because he is so considerate of the feelings of old Mr. Turveydrop; and he had his apprehensions that old Mr. Turveydrop might break his heart, or faint away, or be very much overcome in some affecting manner or other if he made such an announcement.
  • There was such a shock of apprehension in his face, and he knew Richard so perfectly, and I too had seen so much of his gradual decay, that what my dear girl had said to me in the fullness of her foreboding love sounded like a knell in my ears.

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  • When he told us that a large reward was offered by Sir Leicester Dedlock for the murderer’s apprehension, I did not in my first consternation understand why; but a few more words explained to me that the murdered person was Sir Leicester’s lawyer, and immediately my mother’s dread of him rushed into my remembrance.
  • However, what with the exertion of my humble abilities, and what with the help of a mutual friend by the name of Mr. Tony Weevle (who is of a high aristocratic turn and has your ladyship’s portrait always hanging up in his room), I have now reasons for an apprehension as to which I come to put your ladyship upon your guard.
  • My apprehension is, Mr. C.’s circumstances being such, lest it should end in his obtaining leave to part with his commission, which at all events is desirable to be made known to his connexions."

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: apprehension about finals Define
worry about what is to come
as in: apprehension of the criminal Define
the capture of a criminal
as in: conscious apprehension is limited Define
to understand or: in psychology and philosophy: immediate awareness prior to analysis and judgment
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