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Bleak House
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Bleak House
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unspecified meaning
  • It won’t take a minute!
  • "But would you allow me the favour of a minute’s private conversation?"

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  • "Half a minute, miss!" cried Mr. Guppy, checking me as I was about to ring.
  • A quarter of a minute, miss!
  • A space of a minute or two has elapsed before he comes up with her.
  • So he remains for a minute or two, heaped up against it, and then staggers down the shop to the front door.
  • The parties to it understand it least, but it has been observed that no two Chancery lawyers can talk about it for five minutes without coming to a total disagreement as to all the premises.
  • It is twenty-five minutes after its time this afternoon.
  • With two ladies in the coach, this scoundrel has deliberately delayed his arrival six and twenty minutes.
  • We passed not far from the house a few minutes afterwards.

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  • He has his favourite box, he bespeaks all the papers, he is down upon bald patriarchs, who keep them more than ten minutes afterwards.
  • After some minutes he makes an attempt to rise.
  • "And being wanted in the—not to put too fine a point upon it—in the shop," says Mr. Snagsby, rising, "perhaps this good company will excuse me for half a minute."
  • Twenty-five minutes!
  • But stop a minute.
  • In short, she had such a natural, captivating, winning manner that in a few minutes we were sitting in the window-seat, with the light of the fire upon us, talking together as free and happy as could be.
  • He sat considering for a minute or two, with his smile, at once so handsome and so kind, upon his changing face, and then requested me to let them know that he wished to see them.
  • He told Mr. Kenge that the Chancellor would be up in five minutes; and presently we heard a bustle and a tread of feet, and Mr. Kenge said that the Court had risen and his lordship was in the next room.
  • Ten minutes.
  • Ten minutes.
  • Ten minutes.
  • Thus they pass on from room to room, raising the pictured Dedlocks for a few brief minutes as the young gardener admits the light, and reconsigning them to their graves as he shuts it out again.
  • It was that she had improved her acquaintance with Miss Flite, the little crazy old lady, and that she frequently went there early in the morning and met her lover for a few minutes before breakfast—only for a few minutes.
  • It was that she had improved her acquaintance with Miss Flite, the little crazy old lady, and that she frequently went there early in the morning and met her lover for a few minutes before breakfast—only for a few minutes.
  • Presently he rose courteously and released her, and then he spoke for a minute or two with Richard Carstone, not seated, but standing, and altogether with more ease and less ceremony, as if he still knew, though he WAS Lord Chancellor, how to go straight to the candour of a boy.
  • Do you give me a minute’s calm attention, without looking at Rick.
  • But in no more than a minute or two the stairs creak and Tony comes swiftly back.
  • This so intensifies his dudgeon that for five minutes he is in an ill humour.
  • The Chancellor is, within these ten minutes, "up" for the long vacation.
  • A—stop a minute, though!
  • After a little while I missed first Mr. Skimpole and afterwards Richard, and while I was thinking how could Richard stay away so long and lose so much, the maid who had given me the keys looked in at the door, saying, "If you please, miss, could you spare a minute?"
  • Charley gave her one, and the good creature certainly made use of it, for she held it to her eyes with both hands and sat so, shedding tears for the next ten minutes.
  • The respectability of Mr. Vholes has even been cited with crushing effect before Parliamentary committees, as in the following blue minutes of a distinguished attorney’s evidence.
  • Our luggage having arrived and being all at hand, I was dressed in a few minutes and engaged in putting my worldly goods away when a maid (not the one in attendance upon Ada, but another, whom I had not seen) brought a basket into my room with two bunches of keys in it, all labelled.
  • Its compilers and the Reverend Chadband are all one to him, except that he knows the Reverend Chadband and would rather run away from him for an hour than hear him talk for five minutes.
  • But in a minute he came after us down the street without any hat, and with his long hair all blown about, and stopped us, saying fervently, "Miss Summerson, upon my honour and soul, you may depend upon me!"
  • Mrs. Badger gave us in the drawing-room a biographical sketch of the life and services of Captain Swosser before his marriage and a more minute account of him dating from the time when he fell in love with her at a ball on board the Crippler, given to the officers of that ship when she lay in Plymouth Harbour.
  • Sergeant replies—dashed within the last few minutes as to his usual manner of speech, and even as to his usual carriage—that he has received this letter, has been to Mr. Smallweed about it, and has been referred there.
  • It is his quiet habit to walk across the park from the village in fine weather, to drop into this room as if he had never been out of it since he was last seen there, to request a servant to inform Sir Leicester that he is arrived in case he should be wanted, and to appear ten minutes before dinner in the shadow of the library-door.
  • There have been times, when ladies lived in strongholds and had unscrupulous attendants within call, when that poor life of yours would NOT have been worth a minute’s purchase, with those beautiful eyes looking at you as they look at this moment.
  • Being as patient as I am at this minute, I addressed another appeal to him.
  • Clear of the room he looks at his watch but is inclined to doubt it by a minute or thereabouts.
  • After a suspense of a minute or two the door slowly opens and a Frenchwoman enters.
  • Now, I beg of you to follow me close with your attention for a minute or two.
  • Not a minute must be lost.
  • Anyways, there’s more and more danger, every minute, of its drawing to that.
  • We called at another office or station for a minute and crossed the river again.
  • Volumnia understands him perfectly, and in truth he delivers himself with far greater plainness than could have been supposed possible a minute ago.
  • Within a few more minutes he is reported as sending his respects, and could my Lady please to receive him for a word or two after her dinner?
  • He admits that he was alone on the scene of the murder within a few minutes of its commission.
  • Your wife have left me since some minutes.
  • The horses were brought out as soon as we were seen coming, and we were on the road again in a few minutes.
  • Resisting the temptation, but agitating him violently enough to make his head roll like a harlequin’s, he puts him smartly down in his chair again and adjusts his skull-cap with such a rub that the old man winks with both eyes for a minute afterwards.
  • I will not dwell on the suspense and anxiety with which I reflected all this time that we were leaving my mother farther and farther behind every minute.
  • Although it was a very plain one, Ada and Richard were for some minutes both out of the room together helping to get ready what we were to eat and drink.
  • With the strictest truth, for his momentary hesitation was gone (it had not lasted a minute), and his fine, sensible, cordial, sterling manner was restored.
  • Mr. George, having shaved himself before a looking-glass of minute proportions, then marches out, bare-headed and bare-chested, to the pump in the little yard and anon comes back shining with yellow soap, friction, drifting rain, and exceedingly cold water.
  • Even now, coming round by the Sol’s Arms with the intention of passing down the court, and out at the Chancery Lane end, and so terminating his unpremeditated after-supper stroll of ten minutes’ long from his own door and back again, Mr. Snagsby approaches.
  • He finished reading it there, with his back towards me, and after he had finished and had folded it up, stood there for some minutes with the letter in his hand.
  • She stopped a minute.
  • Then she went—it might be at twenty minutes past eleven, and it might be at twenty minutes past twelve; we ain’t got no watches here to know the time by, nor yet clocks.
  • Then she went—it might be at twenty minutes past eleven, and it might be at twenty minutes past twelve; we ain’t got no watches here to know the time by, nor yet clocks.
  • Two minutes wrong?
  • Twenty minutes!
  • To the minute.
  • His love, in all its constancy and generosity, had come so suddenly upon me that he had not left me a minute when my fortitude gave way again and the street was blotted out by my rushing tears.
  • This was not a cheering preparation for my visit, and I could have dispensed with the company of Mr. Vholes, when Richard (who arrived within a minute or two after me) brought him to share our dinner.
  • He completes his observations as quietly and carefully as he has carried them on, leaves everything else precisely as he found it, glides away after some five minutes in all, and passes into the street.
  • Volumnia further makes a merit of not having "closed an eye"—as if she had twenty or thirty—though it is hard to reconcile this statement with her having most indisputably opened two within five minutes.
  • Overpowered by his exertions, he lays his head back on his pillows and closes his eyes for not more than a minute, when he again resumes his watching of the weather and his attention to the muffled sounds.
  • As they go down the little street and the Bagnets pause for a minute looking after them, Mrs. Bagnet remarks to the worthy Lignum that Mr. Bucket "almost clings to George like, and seems to be really fond of him."
  • He withdraws his hand and falls to looking at the sleet and snow again until they seem, by being long looked at, to fall so thick and fast that he is obliged to close his eyes for a minute on the giddy whirl of white flakes and icy blots.
  • Late as it was, I meant to go to her for a few minutes before lying down to sleep, but I went home with my guardian first to make his tea for him and to occupy the old chair by his side, for I did not like to think of its being empty so soon.
  • When every minute added to the proofs of love and kindness that were given me in those five days, and when at last the morning came and when they took me through all the rooms that I might see them for the last time, and when some cried, "Esther, dear, say good-bye to me here at my bedside, where you first spoke so kindly to me!" and when others asked me only to write their names, "With Esther’s love," and when they all surrounded me with their parting presents and clung to me weeping…
  • A gracious message being returned that Sir Leicester will expedite his dressing and join Mr. Bucket in the library within ten minutes, Mr. Bucket repairs to that apartment and stands before the fire with his finger on his chin, looking at the blazing coals.
  • Mr. Bucket, in a low voice, by the light of my guardian’s candle, read to me in the hall a letter that my mother had left upon her table; and I suppose within ten minutes of my having been aroused I was sitting beside him, rolling swiftly through the streets.
  • The birds sang delightfully; the sparkles in the fern, the grass, and trees, were exquisite to see; the richness of the woods seemed to have increased twenty-fold since yesterday, as if, in the still night when they had looked so massively hushed in sleep, Nature, through all the minute details of every wonderful leaf, had been more wakeful than usual for the glory of that day.
  • I could not leave, as I usually did, quite punctually at the time, for I was working for my dear girl and had a few stitches more to do to finish what I was about; but it was within a few minutes of the hour when I bundled up my little work-basket, gave my darling my last kiss for the night, and hurried downstairs.
  • From the village school of Chesney Wold, intact as it is this minute, to the whole framework of society; from the whole framework of society, to the aforesaid framework receiving tremendous cracks in consequence of people (iron-masters, lead-mistresses, and what not) not minding their catechism, and getting out of the station unto which they are called—necessarily and for ever, according to Sir Leicester’s rapid logic, the first station in which they happen to find themselves; and from…
  • "We just twist up Chancery Lane, and cut along Holborn, and there we are in four minutes’ time, as near as a toucher.
  • She’s scarcely had the child off her lap, poor thing, these seven days and nights, except when I’ve been able to take it for a minute or two."
  • Mrs. Snagsby, sir—I shan’t be two minutes, my love!"
  • Twenty-six minutes!" replied Mr. Boythorn, referring to his watch.
  • "I never," she says, "George, consider Matthew Bagnet safe a minute when you’re near him.
  • I am a physician and was requested—five minutes ago—to come and visit a sick man at George’s Shooting Gallery."
  • "Now, little housewife," said my guardian, looking at his watch, "I was strictly timed before I came upstairs, for you must not be tired too soon; and my time has waned away to the last minute.
  • But Mr. Bucket, who cannot make up his mind to relinquish his friendly hold, replies, "Wait half a minute, George.
  • Now we will take five minutes’ rest, and then go on again."
  • "Else why should he talk about his ’twenty minutes past’ and about his having no watch to tell the time by?
  • If you will be so good as to favour me with your attention for a couple of minutes, miss, not more, I’ll endeavour to explain myself as clearly as I can."
  • You don’t know what I’m going to say and do five minutes from this present time, Sir Leicester Dedlock, Baronet; and supposing I was to be picked off now, you might wonder why I hadn’t done it, don’t you see?"
  • But in a few minutes he would recklessly conjure up some undefinable means by which they were both to be made rich and happy for ever, and would become as gay as possible.

  • There are no more uses of "minuteness" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a minute amount Define
very, very small
as in: keep the minutes Define
a written record of what happened at a meeting
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
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