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bound
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Anna Karenina
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bound
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Anna Karenina
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unspecified meaning
  • Taking a run, he dashed down the steps in his skates, crashing and bounding up and down.
  • Frou-Frou started into a gallop, her left foot forward, made two bounds, and fretting at the tightened reins, passed into a jolting trot, bumping her rider up and down.

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  • "It was bound to be so," he said, not looking at her.
  • "No," he said; "I would point out the fact that if, as Pripasov directly asserts, perception is based on sensation, then we are bound to distinguish sharply between these two conceptions."
  • Yes, she was bound to choose him.
  • Your feelings are an affair of your own conscience; but I am in duty bound to you, to myself, and to God, to point out to you your duties.
  • Vronsky was aware of his comrades’ view of him, and in addition to his liking for the life, he felt bound to keep up that reputation.
  • If decent people won’t go into it, of course it’s bound to go all wrong.
  • His pretty, boyish face, with a twist of fresh grass bound round his hair, was all working with effort; but whenever anyone looked at him he smiled.
  • His conception of her was for him a sacred memory, and his future wife was bound to be in his imagination a repetition of that exquisite, holy ideal of a woman that his mother had been.

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  • Our difference of opinion amounts to this, that you make the mainspring self-interest, while I suppose that interest in the common weal is bound to exist in every man of a certain degree of advancement.
  • As the head of the family, I am a person bound in duty to guide her, and consequently, in part the person responsible; I am bound to point out the danger I perceive, to warn her, even to use my authority.
  • As the head of the family, I am a person bound in duty to guide her, and consequently, in part the person responsible; I am bound to point out the danger I perceive, to warn her, even to use my authority.
  • He felt that the love that bound him to Anna was not a momentary impulse, which would pass, as worldly intrigues do pass, leaving no other traces in the life of either but pleasant or unpleasant memories.
  • The thought of immediate action binding her to her son, of going away somewhere with him, gave her this consolation.
  • He could not, because the claims of his own soul were more binding on him than those claims his father and his teacher made upon him.
  • She is bound to be unhappy, but I am not to blame, and so I cannot be unhappy.
  • Whatever your conduct may have been, I do not consider myself justified in breaking the ties in which we are bound by a Higher Power.
  • The people are at such a low stage of rational and moral development, that it’s obvious they’re bound to oppose everything that’s strange to them.
  • She had not complied with his request, and he was bound to punish her and carry out his threat—obtain a divorce and take away his son.
  • "Duties are bound up with rights—power, money, honor; those are what women are seeking," said Pestsov.
  • But Anna’s aunt had through a common acquaintance insinuated that he had already compromised the girl, and that he was in honor bound to make her an offer.
  • During all this early time they had a peculiarly vivid sense of tension, as it were, a tugging in opposite directions of the chain by which they were bound.
  • Now, as he talked to his brother of a matter bound to be exceedingly disagreeable to him, knowing that the eyes of many people might be fixed upon him, he kept a smiling countenance, as though he were jesting with his brother about something of little moment.
  • Now, by the abolition of serfdom we have been deprived of our authority; and so our husbandry, where it had been raised to a high level, is bound to sink to the most savage primitive condition.
  • And at that instant there flashed across his mind the thought of what Serpuhovskoy had just said to him, and what he had himself been thinking in the morning—that it was better not to bind himself —and he knew that this thought he could not tell her.
  • The day of the races had been a very busy day for Alexey Alexandrovitch; but when mentally sketching out the day in the morning, he made up his mind to go to their country house to see his wife immediately after dinner, and from there to the races, which all the Court were to witness, and at which he was bound to be present.
  • His ambitious plans had retreated into the background again, and feeling that he had got out of that circle of activity in which everything was definite, he had given himself entirely to his passion, and that passion was binding him more and more closely to her.
  • Only, to atone for my sins, I’m bound to sit on the box.
  • "That we’re bound to do."
  • The porter asked him, as he gave him his coat, "Where is your honor staying?" and immediately wrote down his address in a big handsomely bound book.
  • She rose and took up a book bound in morocco.
  • Here people understood that a man is in duty bound to live for himself, as every man of culture should live.
  • Now Dolly and her children are under his guardianship; all these peasants who come to him every day, as though he were bound to be at their service.
  • At first, marriage, with the new joys and duties bound up with it, had completely crowded out these thoughts.
  • But like or dislike "the people" as something apart he could not, not only because he lived with "the people," and all his interests were bound up with theirs, but also because he regarded himself as a part of "the people," did not see any special qualities or failings distinguishing himself and "the people," and could not contrast himself with them.
  • The other horses too were frightened, and splashing through the water with their hobbled legs, and drawing their hoofs out of the thick mud with a squelching sound, they bounded out of the marsh.
  • When they reached the house he helped her to get out of the carriage, and making an effort to master himself, took leave of her with his usual urbanity, and uttered that phrase that bound him to nothing; he said that tomorrow he would let her know his decision.
  • To consent to a divorce, to give her her freedom, meant in his thoughts to take from himself the last tie that bound him to life—the children whom he loved; and to take from her the last prop that stayed her on the path of right, to thrust her down to her ruin.
  • Whether we have acted rightly or wrongly is another question, but the die is cast," he said, passing from Russian to French, "and we are bound together for life.
  • He was struck at first by the idea that the apprehension of divine truths had not been vouchsafed to man, but to a corporation of men bound together by love—to the church.
  • And in spite of this he felt that then, when his love was stronger, he could, if he had greatly wished it, have torn that love out of his heart; but now, when as at that moment it seemed to him he felt no love for her, he knew that what bound him to her could not be broken.
  • She did not very much like it that he, who was in love with her daughter, had kept coming to the house for six weeks, as though he were waiting for something, inspecting, as though he were afraid he might be doing them too great an honor by making an offer, and did not realize that a man, who continually visits at a house where there is a young unmarried girl, is bound to make his intentions clear.
  • Not feeling the motion of her legs, Laska bounded with a stiff gallop, so that at each bound she could stop short, to the right, away from the wind that blew from the east before sunrise, and turned facing the wind.
  • She called Varenka at that moment merely in order mentally to give her a blessing for the important event which, as Kitty fancied, was bound to come to pass that day after dinner in the wood.
  • And she felt that beside the love that bound them together there had grown up between them some evil spirit of strife, which she could not exorcise from his, and still less from her own heart.
  • All her life, all her desires and hopes were concentrated on this one man, still uncomprehended by her, to whom she was bound by a feeling of alternate attraction and repulsion, even less comprehended than the man himself, and all the while she was going on living in the outward conditions of her old life.
  • Not feeling the motion of her legs, Laska bounded with a stiff gallop, so that at each bound she could stop short, to the right, away from the wind that blew from the east before sunrise, and turned facing the wind.
  • But, however I screw up my eyes and strain my sight, I cannot see it not round and not bounded, and in spite of my knowing about infinite space, I am incontestably right when I see a solid blue dome, and more right than when I strain my eyes to see beyond it.
  • …that it was Stepan Arkadyevitch’s way not to call the dishes by the names in the French bill of fare, did not repeat them after him, but could not resist rehearsing the whole menu to himself according to the bill:—"_Soupe printaniere, turbot, sauce Beaumarchais, poulard a l’estragon, macedoine de fruits_….etc.," and then instantly, as though worked by springs, laying down one bound bill of fare, he took up another, the list of wines, and submitted it to Stepan Arkadyevitch.
  • That now, having expiated his sin against the husband, he was bound to renounce her, and never in future to stand between her with her repentance and her husband, he had firmly decided in his heart; but he could not tear out of his heart his regret at the loss of her love, he could not erase from his memory those moments of happiness that he had so little prized at the time, and that haunted him in all their charm.
  • But the next note, changed to pay for providing a dinner for their relations, that cost twenty-eight roubles, though it did excite in Levin the reflection that twenty-eight roubles meant nine measures of oats, which men would with groans and sweat have reaped and bound and thrashed and winnowed and sifted and sown,—this next one he parted with more easily.
  • This concentration of the footman upon his lamps, and his indifference to what was passing in Levin, at first astounded him, but immediately on considering the question he realized that no one knew or was bound to know his feelings, and that it was all the more necessary to act calmly, sensibly, and resolutely to get through this wall of indifference and attain his aim.
  • And they don’t sanction the gentry’s moving outside bounds clearly laid down in their ideas."
  • To reap and bind the rye and oats and to carry it, to mow the meadows, turn over the fallows, thrash the seed and sow the winter corn—all this seems so simple and ordinary; but to succeed in getting through it all everyone in the village, from the old man to the young child, must toil incessantly for three or four weeks, three times as hard as usual, living on rye-beer, onions, and black bread, thrashing and carrying the sheaves at night, and not giving more than two or three hours in…
  • "But as I told you then, and have written to you," he said in a thin, shrill voice, "I repeat now, that I am not bound to know this.
  • "I should not be able to speak to her without a feeling of reproach; I could not look at her without resentment; and she will only hate me all the more, as she’s bound to.
  • I saw one at the Vienna exhibition, which binds with a wire," said Sviazhsky.
  • "It’s a pity it doesn’t bind too.

  • There are no more uses of "bound" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: south-bound lanes Define
travelling in a particular direction or to a specific location
as in: She's bound to succeed. Define
almost certain to; or determined to
as in: bound together Define
held together (connected or united) or wrapped (see word notes for a more detailed definition based upon context)
as in: I can't/must. I'm bound by... Define
tied up, prevented, or required
as in: the binding is loose Define
something that holds things together, or wraps or covers or ties something
as in: It put me in a bind. Define
a difficult situation
as in: out of bounds; bounded on the east Define
a boundary or limit
as in: The deer bound across the trail. Define
to leap or jump
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