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approach
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Anna Karenina
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approach
Used In
Anna Karenina
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unspecified meaning
  • The guard’s words roused him, and forced him to think of his mother and his approaching meeting with her.
  • "Why, it’s actually you, Levin, at last!" he said with a friendly mocking smile, scanning Levin as he approached.

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  • Rows of carriages, sledges, drivers, and policemen were standing in the approach.
  • He approached with timidity, but again her smile reassured him.
  • Joyfully, intently, and at the same time timidly, he gazed at the approaching figure, and slowly he rose to his feet.
  • But as he approached his mother-in-law, he responded in a mournful and crestfallen tone to her inquiries about Dolly’s health.
  • In that direction gazed the young men, not venturing to approach.
  • She was aware of her husband approaching a long way off, and she could not help following him in the surging crowd in the midst of which he was moving.
  • At the moment when he was approaching Anna Arkadyevna he noticed too with joy that she was conscious of his being near, and looked round, and seeing him, turned again to her husband.
  • The approach of the train was more and more evident by the preparatory bustle in the station, the rush of porters, the movement of policemen and attendants, and people meeting the train.

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  • In the very first minute the close group of horsemen drew out, and it could be seen that they were approaching the stream in twos and threes and one behind another.
  • "And that’s his wife," she added, indicating Anna Pavlovna, who, as though on purpose, at the very instant they approached walked away after a child that had run off along a path.
  • But before the obstacle they were approaching, Vronsky began working at the reins, anxious to avoid having to take the outer circle, and swiftly passed Mahotin just upon the declivity.
  • The excitement of the approaching race gained upon him as he drove further and further into the atmosphere of the races, overtaking carriages driving up from the summer villas or out of Petersburg.
  • As he approached her, his beautiful eyes shone with a specially tender light, and with a faint, happy, and modestly triumphant smile (so it seemed to Levin), bowing carefully and respectfully over her, he held out his small broad hand to her.
  • She went up to Alexey Alexandrovitch, and with the familiarity given by the approach of death took him by the arm and drew him towards the bedroom.
  • Stepan Arkadyevitch approached him cautiously, whispered something, and making a sign to Levin, walked back again.
  • Directly Vronsky went towards her, she drew in a deep breath, and, turning back her prominent eye till the white looked bloodshot, she started at the approaching figures from the opposite side, shaking her muzzle, and shifting lightly from one leg to the other.
  • He had expected to find the physical signs of the approach of death more marked—greater weakness, greater emaciation, but still almost the same condition of things.
  • When the softening effect of the near approach of death had passed away, Alexey Alexandrovitch began to notice that Anna was afraid of him, ill at ease with him, and could not look him straight in the face.
  • Besides that, he had that feeling of concentrated excitement that every sportsman experiences as he approaches the scene of action.
  • When the child at last was still, and had been put in a deep bed, and the nurse, after smoothing the little pillow, had left her, Alexey Alexandrovitch got up, and walking awkwardly on tiptoe, approached the baby.
  • Instinctively feeling the approach of spring, and knowing that there would be days of rough weather too, she built her nest as best she could, and was in haste at the same time to build it and to learn how to do it.
  • Directly she had gone out, swift, swift light steps sounded on the parquet, and his bliss, his life, himself—what was best in himself, what he had so long sought and longed for—was quickly, so quickly approaching him.
  • He was himself unconscious how, as he approached them, he seized on this impression and absorbed it, as he had the chin of the shopkeeper who had sold him the cigars, and put it away somewhere to be brought out when he wanted it.
  • The crowd parted to make way for Sergey Ivanovitch approaching the table.
  • They were the generals organizing the approaching battle.
  • "Very, very glad to have met you," he added, seeing Sviazhsky approaching him.
  • Approaching footsteps—his steps—distracted her attention.
  • With a rapid, light step she went down the steps that led from the tank to the rails and stopped quite near the approaching train.
  • Seeing a lady approaching with a collecting box, he beckoned her up and put in a five-rouble note.
  • And she began to long for that, and made up her mind to agree to it the first time he or Stiva approached her on the subject.
  • Sergey Ivanovitch fancied, as he approached him, that Vronsky saw him but was pretending not to see.
  • As soon as Levin approached the bath, the experiment was tried, and it was completely successful.
  • Seeing Sergey Ivanovitch approaching, she did not get up and did not change her position, but everything told him that she felt his presence and was glad of it.
  • In spite of the terrible change in the face, Levin had only to glance at those eager eyes raised at his approach, only to catch the faint movement of the mouth under the sticky mustache, to realize the terrible truth that this death-like body was his living brother.
  • The doctor, the monthly nurse, and Dolly and her mother, and most of all Levin, who could not think of the approaching event without terror, began to be impatient and uneasy.
  • If Levin could have understood why, just as he saw why one can only approach the booking office of a railway station in single file, it would not have been so vexatious and tiresome to him.
  • And, disagreeable as it was to the princess to seem to take the first step in wishing to make the acquaintance of Madame Stahl, who thought fit to give herself airs, she made inquiries about Varenka, and, having ascertained particulars about her tending to prove that there could be no harm though little good in the acquaintance, she herself approached Varenka and made acquaintance with her.
  • Particularly sculpturesque and plastic, so to say, and richly colored is that passage where you feel Cordelia’s approach, where woman, das ewig Weibliche, enters into conflict with fate.
  • Levin’s coachman, in his by no means new coat and shabby hat, with his ill-matched horses and his coach with the patched mud-guards, drove with gloomy determination into the covered gravel approach.
  • He had spent a whole month in Moscow with nothing to do, when Sergey Ivanovitch, who had property in the Kashinsky province, and took great interest in the question of the approaching elections, made ready to set off to the elections.
  • On his way back, tired and hungry from shooting, Levin had so distinct a vision of meat-pies that as he approached the hut he seemed to smell and taste them, as Laska had smelt the game, and he immediately told Philip to give him some.
  • Just as Levin had disliked all the trivial preparations for his wedding, as derogatory to the grandeur of the event, now he felt still more offensive the preparations for the approaching birth, the date of which they reckoned, it seemed, on their fingers.
  • He seemed to him still more uncongenial and superfluous when, on approaching the steps where the whole party, children and grown-up, were gathered together in much excitement, Levin saw Vassenka Veslovsky, with a particularly warm and gallant air, kissing Kitty’s hand.
  • He had quite forgotten the momentary unpleasant impression, and alone with her he felt, now that the thought of her approaching motherhood was never for a moment absent from his mind, a new and delicious bliss, quite pure from all alloy of sense, in the being near to the woman he loved.
  • The nobles, both in the larger and the smaller rooms, grouped themselves in camps, and from their hostile and suspicious glances, from the silence that fell upon them when outsiders approached a group, and from the way that some, whispering together, retreated to the farther corridor, it was evident that each side had secrets from the other.
  • After that, with an irrepressible smile of tenderness, Kitty recalled her husband’s shamefaced embarrassment, his repeated awkward efforts to approach the subject, and how at last, having thought of the one means of helping Dolly without wounding her pride, he had suggested to Kitty—what had not occurred to her before—that she should give up her share of the property.
  • Quite the contrary; a child can kill a bear," he said, with a slight bow moving aside for the ladies, who were approaching the table.
  • "And the worst of it all," thought he, "is that just now, at the very moment when my great work is approaching completion" (he was thinking of the project he was bringing forward at the time), "when I stand in need of all my mental peace and all my energies, just now this stupid worry should fall foul of me.
  • Run along, run along, Vassily Lukitch is calling you," said the porter, hearing the tutor’s steps approaching, and carefully taking away from his belt the little hand in the glove half pulled off, he signed with his head towards the tutor.
  • A moment’s silence followed, after which Countess Lidia Ivanovna, as though approaching the main topic of conversation, said with a fine smile to Oblonsky: "I’ve known you for a long while, and am very glad to make a closer acquaintance with you.

  • There are no more uses of "approach" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: approached the city Define
to come near or nearer
as in: use the best approach Define
a way of doing something; or a rout that leads to a particular place
as in: approached her with the proposal Define
to speak with someone about something for the first time -- such as a proposal -- often something discussed in a delicate, tentative way
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