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Anna Karenina
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Anna Karenina
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unspecified meaning
  • There was nothing cheerful and joyous in the feeling; on the contrary, it was a new torture of apprehension.
  • And most of all, at there being far more apprehension and pity than pleasure.

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  • He was struck at first by the idea that the apprehension of divine truths had not been vouchsafed to man, but to a corporation of men bound together by love—to the church.
  • And this sense was so painful at first, the apprehension lest this helpless creature should suffer was so intense, that it prevented him from noticing the strange thrill of senseless joy and even pride that he had felt when the baby sneezed.
  • "Then the children’s illnesses, that everlasting apprehension; then bringing them up; evil propensities" (she thought of little Masha’s crime among the raspberries), "education, Latin—it’s all so incomprehensible and difficult.

  • There are no more uses of "apprehension" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: apprehension about finals Define
worry about what is to come
as in: apprehension of the criminal Define
the capture of a criminal
as in: conscious apprehension is limited Define
to understand or: in psychology and philosophy: immediate awareness prior to analysis and judgment
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