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War and Peace
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War and Peace
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as in: out of bounds; bounded on the east Define
a boundary or limit
  • He was ridiculous, and unpleasantly sarcastic, but yet he inspired involuntary respect by his boundless devotion to an idea.
  • But the latter’s good-natured naivete was so boundless that sometimes even he involuntarily yielded to Nicholas’ good humor.

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  • Not only could he no longer think the thoughts that had first come to him as he lay gazing at the sky on the field of Austerlitz and had later enlarged upon with Pierre, and which had filled his solitude at Bogucharovo and then in Switzerland and Rome, but he even dreaded to recall them and the bright and boundless horizons they had revealed.
  • There was only one expression on her agitated face when she ran into the drawing room—that of love—boundless love for him, for her, and for all that was near to the man she loved; and of pity, suffering for others, and passionate desire to give herself entirely to helping them.

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  • The ball went out of bounds.
  • She stepped out of bounds, so the other team got the ball.

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unspecified meaning
  • To the left the horizon bounded by the adjacent wood.
  • Why did I bind myself to her?

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  • General, I must obey orders, but I am not bound to endure….
  • "Not bound to endure insults," Dolokhov concluded in loud, ringing tones.
  • But it won’t do, because you see, if you say that—if you consider yourself bound by your promise—it will seem as if she had not meant it seriously.
  • At last he moved up to Pierre and, taking the kerchief that lay on the table, again bound his eyes.
  • The curtains were drawn, and a single candle was burning on the table, screened by a bound music book so that the light did not fall on the cot.
  • Having taken a kerchief from the cupboard, Willarski bound Pierre’s eyes with it and tied it in a knot behind, catching some hairs painfully in the knot.
  • Kutuzov’s expectations that the proposals of capitulation (which were in no way binding) might give time for part of the transport to pass, and also that Murat’s mistake would very soon be discovered, proved correct.
  • At the right beat of the music he looked sideways at his partner with a merry and triumphant air, suddenly stamped with one foot, bounded from the floor like a ball, and flew round the room taking his partner with him.

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  • But in the secret depths of her soul the question whether her engagement to Boris was a jest or an important, binding promise tormented her.
  • Only then will our order have the power unobtrusively to bind the hands of the protectors of disorder and to control them without their being aware of it.
  • And in fact two more peasants began binding Dron, who took off his own belt and handed it to them, as if to aid them.
  • She was very pretty and sweet, and evidently deeply in love with him, but he was at the period of youth when there seems so much to do that there is no time for that sort of thing and a young man fears to bind himself and prizes his freedom which he needs for so many other things.
  • Prince Andrew had loved his wife, she died, but that was not enough: he wanted to bind his happiness to another woman.
  • "Bind him, bind him!" he shouted, though there was no one to bind him but Lavrushka and Alpatych.
  • "Bind him, bind him!" he shouted, though there was no one to bind him but Lavrushka and Alpatych.
  • "Bind him, bind him!" he shouted, though there was no one to bind him but Lavrushka and Alpatych.
  • Alpatych turned to the peasants and ordered two of them by name to come and bind Karp.
  • The hare arched his back and bounded off yet more swiftly.
  • All the interests of his life for more than thirty years had been bounded by the will of the prince, and he never went beyond that limit.
  • Every courtier considers himself bound to maintain his position worthily.
  • At the same time he felt that the deeper the ground sank under him the closer bound he involuntarily became to the order.
  • When she was touched, she jerked her bound legs and looked wildly yet simply at everybody.
  • "A hare’s track, a lot of tracks!" rang out Natasha’s voice through the frost-bound air.
  • "Mon cher," answered Anatole (their whole conversation was in French), "I don’t consider myself bound to answer questions put to me in that tone."
  • What they would have said and what they would have done she felt bound to say and do.
  • The two bound men were led off to the master’s house.
  • But he went with the firm intention of letting her and her parents feel that the childish relations between himself and Natasha could not be binding either on her or on him.
  • He took a dozen bounds, not very quickly, letting the borzois gain on him, and, finally having chosen his direction and realized his danger, laid back his ears and rushed off headlong.
  • The wolf crouched, gnashed her teeth, and again rose and bounded forward, followed at the distance of a couple of feet by all the borzois, who did not get any closer to her.
  • Not only in the soul of the frightened yet happy and enraptured Natasha, but in the whole house, there was a feeling of awe at something important that was bound to happen.
  • What convinces is when one sees a being dear to one, bound up with one’s own life, before whom one was to blame and had hoped to make it right" (Prince Andrew’s voice trembled and he turned away), "and suddenly that being is seized with pain, suffers, and ceases to exist….
  • A stick was thrust between her jaws and she was fastened with a leash, as if bridled, her legs were bound together, and Daniel rolled her over once or twice from side to side.
  • He recalled Anna Pavlovna’s words and looks when she spoke to him about his house, recalled thousands of such hints from Prince Vasili and others, and was seized by terror lest he had already, in some way, bound himself to do something that was evidently wrong and that he ought not to do.
  • This question suddenly presented itself to her, and in answer she saw him before her with the expression that was on his face as he lay in his coffin with his chin bound up with a white handkerchief.
  • Nicholas did not hear his own cry nor feel that he was galloping, nor see the borzois, nor the ground over which he went: he saw only the wolf, who, increasing her speed, bounded on in the same direction along the hollow.
  • He said that as he was responsible for the delay he ought to bear the whole burden of it; that he had given his word and bound himself forever, but that he did not wish to bind Natasha and gave her perfect freedom.
  • He said that as he was responsible for the delay he ought to bear the whole burden of it; that he had given his word and bound himself forever, but that he did not wish to bind Natasha and gave her perfect freedom.
  • "Only she lets her love of her husband and children overflow all bounds," said the countess, "so that it even becomes absurd."
  • Meanwhile the younger generation: Boris, the officer, Anna Mikhaylovna’s son; Nicholas, the undergraduate, the count’s eldest son; Sonya, the count’s fifteen-year-old niece, and little Petya, his youngest boy, had all settled down in the drawing room and were obviously trying to restrain within the bounds of decorum the excitement and mirth that shone in all their faces.
  • Bang, bang! went the first sleigh over a cradle hole in the snow of the road, and each of the other sleighs jolted in the same way, and rudely breaking the frost-bound stillness, the troykas began to speed along the road, one after the other.
  • At first Pierre wished to take another seat so as not to trouble the lady, and also to pick up the glove himself and to pass round the doctors who were not even in his way; but all at once he felt that this would not do, and that tonight he was a person obliged to perform some sort of awful rite which everyone expected of him, and that he was therefore bound to accept their services.
  • Yet in spite of this your vow was binding.
  • Pierre felt particularly well disposed toward them all, but was now instinctively on his guard for fear of binding himself in any way.
  • And with this aim, in one of her talks with her Father Confessor, she insisted on an answer to the question, in how far was she bound by her marriage?
  • I was bound to act that way….
  • With hurried hands the soldiers blindfolded them, drawing the sacks over their heads, and bound them to the post.
  • His hair was bound round, workman fashion, with a wisp of lime-tree bast, and his round face seemed rounder and pleasanter than ever.
  • "Russia and summer weather are not bound together," he thought, repeating words of Karataev’s which he found strangely consoling.
  • Prince Andrew’s last days had bound Princess Mary and Natasha together; this new sorrow brought them still closer to one another.
  • "I daresay you would like to bind me!" shouted the publican, pushing away the men advancing on him, and snatching his cap from his head he flung it on the ground.
  • He only remembered beating someone and being beaten and finally feeling that his hands were bound and that a crowd of French soldiers stood around him and were searching him.
  • I went to my room and reread Joseph Alexeevich’s letters and recalled my conversations with him, and deduced from it all that I ought not to refuse a suppliant, and ought to reach a helping hand to everyone—especially to one so closely bound to me—and that I must bear my cross.
  • Bind him, lads!
  • The whole plan of our order should be based on the idea of preparing men of firmness and virtue bound together by unity of conviction—aiming at the punishment of vice and folly, and patronizing talent and virtue: raising worthy men from the dust and attaching them to our Brotherhood.
  • Something in him had suddenly changed; there was no longer the former poetic and mystic charm of desire, but there was pity for her feminine and childish weakness, fear at her devotion and trustfulness, and an oppressive yet joyful sense of the duty that now bound him to her forever.
  • Besides the common impulse which bound the whole crowd of French into one mass and supplied them with a certain energy, there was another cause binding them together—their great numbers.
  • Besides the common impulse which bound the whole crowd of French into one mass and supplied them with a certain energy, there was another cause binding them together—their great numbers.
  • But suddenly Helene, who was getting bored, said with one of her bewitching smiles: "But I think that having espoused the true religion I cannot be bound by what a false religion laid upon me."
  • Moscow was burned because it found itself in a position in which any town built of wood was bound to burn, quite apart from whether it had, or had not, a hundred and thirty inferior fire engines.
  • Its immediate result for the Russians was, and was bound to be, that we were brought nearer to the destruction of Moscow—which we feared more than anything in the world; and for the French its immediate result was that they were brought nearer to the destruction of their whole army—which they feared more than anything in the world.
  • Not only did no one see this, but on the Russian side every effort was made to hinder the only thing that could save Russia, while on the French side, despite Napoleon’s experience and so-called military genius, every effort was directed to pushing on to Moscow at the end of the summer, that is, to doing the very thing that was bound to lead to destruction.
  • When he had reported himself to the commander of the regiment and had been reassigned to his former squadron, had been on duty and had gone out foraging, when he had again entered into all the little interests of the regiment and felt himself deprived of liberty and bound in one narrow, unchanging frame, he experienced the same sense of peace, of moral support, and the same sense of being at home here in his own place, as he had felt under the parental roof.
  • But after the night in Mytishchi when, half delirious, he had seen her for whom he longed appear before him and, having pressed her hand to his lips, had shed gentle, happy tears, love for a particular woman again crept unobserved into his heart and once more bound him to life.
  • He had long been thinking of entering the army and would have done so had he not been hindered, first, by his membership of the Society of Freemasons to which he was bound by oath and which preached perpetual peace and the abolition of war, and secondly, by the fact that when he saw the great mass of Muscovites who had donned uniform and were talking patriotism, he somehow felt ashamed to take the step.
  • But the chief reason for not carrying out his intention to enter the army lay in the vague idea that he was L’russe Besuhof who had the number of the beast, 666; that his part in the great affair of setting a limit to the power of the beast that spoke great and blasphemous things had been predestined from eternity, and that therefore he ought not to undertake anything, but wait for what was bound to come to pass.
  • Under the influence of this feeling Sonya, whose life of dependence had taught her involuntarily to be secretive, having answered the countess in vague general terms, avoided talking with her and resolved to wait till she should see Nicholas, not in order to set him free but on the contrary at that meeting to bind him to her forever.
  • To Pierre’s assurances that he was not a Frenchman, the captain, evidently not understanding how anyone could decline so flattering an appellation, shrugged his shoulders and said that if Pierre absolutely insisted on passing for a Russian let it be so, but for all that he would be forever bound to Pierre by gratitude for saving his life.
  • This is what makes it evident that a drowning man is less free and more subject to necessity than one standing on dry ground, and that makes the actions of a man closely connected with others in a thickly populated district, or of one bound by family, official, or business duties, seem certainly less free and more subject to necessity than those of a man living in solitude and seclusion.
  • Princess Mary spoke of her childhood, of her mother, her father, and her daydreams; and Natasha, who with a passive lack of understanding had formerly turned away from that life of devotion, submission, and the poetry of Christian self-sacrifice, now feeling herself bound to Princess Mary by affection, learned to love her past too and to understand a side of life previously incomprehensible to her.
  • Bind him, Lavrushka!" shouted Rostov, as if that order, too, could not possibly meet with any opposition.
  • He noticed her watching him, raised his eyes, and began to speak seriously: "One thing would be terrible," said he: "to bind oneself forever to a suffering man.
  • I should be given a small room as a favor, the soldiers would violate my father’s newly dug grave to steal his crosses and stars, they would tell me of their victories over the Russians, and would pretend to sympathize with my sorrow…." thought Princess Mary, not thinking her own thoughts but feeling bound to think like her father and her brother.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: south-bound lanes Define
travelling in a particular direction or to a specific location
as in: She's bound to succeed. Define
almost certain to; or determined to
as in: bound together Define
held together (connected or united) or wrapped (see word notes for a more detailed definition based upon context)
as in: I can't/must. I'm bound by... Define
tied up, prevented, or required
as in: the binding is loose Define
something that holds things together, or wraps or covers or ties something
as in: It put me in a bind. Define
a difficult situation
as in: out of bounds; bounded on the east Define
a boundary or limit
as in: The deer bound across the trail. Define
to leap or jump
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