To better see all uses of the word
War and Peace
please enable javascript.

Used In
War and Peace
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary

unspecified meaning
  • The troops of the vanguard were stationed before Wischau, within sight of the enemy’s lines, which all day long had yielded ground to us at the least firing.
  • It was the story of a girl who had been seduced, and to whom her poor mother (sa pauvre mere) appeared, and reproached her for yielding to a man without being married.

  • Show more
  • On waking I lay long in bed yielding to sloth.
  • And next day, Count Ilya Rostov—though he had not yet quite yielded—went to inquire how he could arrange for Petya to serve where there would be least danger.
  • They have yielded up all Europe to him, and have now come to teach us.
  • Let others—the young—yield afresh to that fraud, but we know life, our life is finished!
  • Only the dead-looking evergreen firs dotted about in the forest, and this oak, refused to yield to the charm of spring or notice either the spring or the sunshine.
  • Even those playing cards behind the partition soon left their game and came over to the samovar, yielding to the general mood of courting Mary Hendrikhovna.
  • "Oh, no, no!" warmly rejoined Prince Vasili, who would not now yield Kutuzov to anyone; in his opinion Kutuzov was not only admirable himself, but was adored by everybody.
  • When after a bachelor supper he rose with his amiable and kindly smile, yielding to the entreaties of the festive company to drive off somewhere with them, shouts of delight and triumph arose among the young men.

  • Show more again
  • Oh, what a terrible thing is fear, and how shamefully I yielded to it!
  • They were going into a tiny recess behind a partition to change, but found it completely filled by three officers who sat playing cards by the light of a solitary candle on an empty box, and these officers would on no account yield their position.
  • "But the law, religion…." said the prince, already yielding.
  • The carpets yielded and the lid closed; Natasha, clapping her hands, screamed with delight and tears fell from her eyes.
  • If the government offices were removed, this was only done on the demand of officials to whom the count yielded reluctantly.
  • But the latter’s good-natured naivete was so boundless that sometimes even he involuntarily yielded to Nicholas’ good humor.
  • But the assignment of these various meanings to the factor does not yield results which accord with the historic facts.
  • He took the glove in silence from the aide-de-camp, and sat down in the lady’s chair, placing his huge hands symmetrically on his knees in the naive attitude of an Egyptian statue, and decided in his own mind that all was as it should be, and that in order not to lose his head and do foolish things he must not act on his own ideas tonight, but must yield himself up entirely to the will of those who were guiding him.
  • A modern branch of mathematics having achieved the art of dealing with the infinitely small can now yield solutions in other more complex problems of motion which used to appear insoluble.
  • After his first visit Boris said to himself that Natasha attracted him just as much as ever, but that he must not yield to that feeling, because to marry her, a girl almost without fortune, would mean ruin to his career, while to renew their former relations without intending to marry her would be dishonorable.
  • CHAPTER I. Napoleon began the war with Russia because he could not resist going to Dresden, could not help having his head turned by the homage he received, could not help donning a Polish uniform and yielding to the stimulating influence of a June morning, and could not refrain from bursts of anger in the presence of Kurakin and then of Balashev.
  • Hard as it was for Princess Mary to emerge from the realm of secluded contemplation in which she had lived till then, and sorry and almost ashamed as she felt to leave Natasha alone, yet the cares of life demanded her attention and she involuntarily yielded to them.
  • But those glances expressed something more: they said that she had played her part in life, that what they now saw was not her whole self, that we must all become like her, and that they were glad to yield to her, to restrain themselves for this once precious being formerly as full of life as themselves, but now so much to be pitied.
  • As at Tilsit Rostov had not allowed himself to doubt that what everybody considered right was right, so now, after a short but sincere struggle between his effort to arrange his life by his own sense of justice, and in obedient submission to circumstances, he chose the latter and yielded to the power he felt irresistibly carrying him he knew not where.
  • It was impossible first because—as experience shows that a three-mile movement of columns on a battlefield never coincides with the plans—the probability of Chichagov, Kutuzov, and Wittgenstein effecting a junction on time at an appointed place was so remote as to be tantamount to impossibility, as in fact thought Kutuzov, who when he received the plan remarked that diversions planned over great distances do not yield the desired results.
  • And it is well for a people who do not—as the French did in 1813—salute according to all the rules of art, and, presenting the hilt of their rapier gracefully and politely, hand it to their magnanimous conqueror, but at the moment of trial, without asking what rules others have adopted in similar cases, simply and easily pick up the first cudgel that comes to hand and strike with it till the feeling of resentment and revenge in their soul yields to a feeling of contempt and compassion.
  • And yet there need only be a discussion and she has no words of her own but only repeats his sayings…." added Nicholas, yielding to that irresistible inclination which tempts us to judge those nearest and dearest to us.

  • There are no more uses of "yield" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: will yield valuable data Define
to produce something wanted; or the thing or amount produced
as in: yield to pressure Define
to give in, give way, or give up
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading