To better see all uses of the word
pique
in
Middlemarch
please enable javascript.

Go to New Version of This Page
This old version has not been updated since 2016,
but we're leaving it in case you prefer it.
Show What's New
Please update your links from the new version.
pique
Used In
Middlemarch
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

unspecified meaning
  • "There are a great many celebrated people writing in the ’Keepsake,’ at all events," he said, in a tone at once piqued and timid.
  • She piqued herself on writing a hand in which each letter was distinguishable without any large range of conjecture, and she meant to make much use of this accomplishment, to save Mr. Casaubon’s eyes.

  • Show more
  • Now Fred piqued himself on keeping clear of lies, and even fibs; he often shrugged his shoulders and made a significant grimace at what he called Rosamond’s fibs (it is only brothers who can associate such ideas with a lovely girl); and rather than incur the accusation of falsehood he would even incur some trouble and self-restraint.
  • —that Will exaggerated his admiration for Mrs. Casaubon in order to pique herself.
  • Also he was piqued that he had been what he called such a stupid lout as to ask that intervention from Mr. Farebrother.
  • Mary was wondering at Fred’s piqued tone, when Mr. Farebrother came in and had to hear the news about the engagement under Mr. Garth.
  • A layman who pried into the professional conduct of medical men, and was always obtruding his reforms,—though he was less directly embarrassing to the two physicians than to the surgeon-apothecaries who attended paupers by contract, was nevertheless offensive to the professional nostril as such; and Dr. Minchin shared fully in the new pique against Bulstrode, excited by his apparent determination to patronize Lydgate.
  • Almost any other man than Caleb Garth might have been tempted to linger on the spot for the sake of hearing all he could about a man whose acquaintance with Bulstrode seemed to imply passages in the banker’s life so unlike anything that was known of him in Middlemarch that they must have the nature of a secret to pique curiosity.

  • There are no more uses of "pique" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: pique your interest Define
to excite -- especially one's interest or curiosity
as in: in a pique about it Define
a feeling of resentment or indignation; or to excite such a feeling
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading