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countenance
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Middlemarch
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countenance
Used In
Middlemarch
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as in: giving countenance Define
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
  • Mr. Brooke, who had before heard only imperfect hints of it, and was very uneasy that he had "gone a little too far" in countenancing Bulstrode, now got himself fully informed, and felt some benevolent sadness in talking to Mr. Farebrother about the ugly light in which Lydgate had come to be regarded.
  • In my time whist was thought an undeniable amusement for a good churchman," said Mrs. Farebrother, innocent of the meaning that whist had for her son, and speaking rather sharply, as at some dangerous countenancing of new doctrine.

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  • Thesiger has always countenanced him," said Mrs. Hackbutt.

  • There are no more uses of "countenance" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • We will not countenance torture.
  • They countenance and support terrorism.

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unspecified meaning
  • Nay, Celia, that is too much to ask, that I should wear trinkets to keep you in countenance.
  • But Sir James’s countenance changed a little.

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  • I like her countenance.
  • With a quick change of countenance he rose and went out of the room.
  • "I can do nothing to hinder it, Cadwallader," he added, turning for a little countenance toward the Rector, who said— "—I—should not make any fuss about it.

  • There are no more uses of "countenance" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a pleasant countenance Define
facial expression; or face; or composure
as in: giving countenance Define
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
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