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distinct
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Bleak House
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distinct
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Bleak House
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  • "I think so," he returned very gently, and kindly, and very distinctly.
  • At length, by slow degrees, they became indistinct and mingled.
  • "I should like to walk a little," says my Lady with unmistakable distinctness.
  • Has an indistinct impression of his aristocratic repute.
  • Mrs. Snagsby, in a spectral bass voice and without removing her eyes from Chadband, says with dreadful distinctness, "Go away!"
  • "Oh!" says Mr. Snagsby, but not appearing to see quite distinctly.
  • There is no other principle distinctly, certainly, and consistently maintained through all its narrow turnings.
  • Sir Leicester is distinctly heard to gasp before speaking.
  • They suggested one distinct idea to her, for she said with her placid smile, and shaking her head, "My good Miss Summerson, at half the cost, this weak child might have been equipped for Africa!"
  • I have a very indistinct remembrance of that night melting into day, and of day melting into night again; but I was just able on the first morning to get to the window and speak to my darling.
  • "In reference," proceeds the Chancellor with extra distinctness, "to the young girl and boy, the two young people"—Mr. Tangle crushed— "whom I directed to be in attendance to-day and who are now in my private room, I will see them and satisfy myself as to the expediency of making the order for their residing with their uncle."
  • This she says with great deliberation and distinctness and with no more outward passion than himself.
  • Mr. Tulkinghorn, an indistinct form against the dark street now dotted with lamps, looms in my Lady’s view, bigger and blacker than before.
  • Mr. Bucket makes three distinctly different bows to these three people.
  • He did so shortly and distinctly.
  • It is too dark to see much of the Allegory overhead there, but that importunate Roman, who is for ever toppling out of the clouds and pointing, is at his old work pretty distinctly.
  • The river had a fearful look, so overcast and secret, creeping away so fast between the low flat lines of shore—so heavy with indistinct and awful shapes, both of substance and shadow; so death-like and mysterious.
  • But if such shadows flit before him to his bewilderment, there is one other shadow which he can name with something like distinctness even yet and to which alone he addresses his tearing of his white hair and his extended arms.
  • And even to the point of his sinking on the ground, oblivious of his suffering, he can yet pronounce her name with something like distinctness in the midst of those intrusive sounds, and in a tone of mourning and compassion rather than reproach.
  • Still I cried very much, not only in the fullness of my heart after reading the letter, not only in the strangeness of the prospect— for it was strange though I had expected the contents—but as if something for which there was no name or distinct idea were indefinitely lost to me.
  • I cannot separate and define the feelings that arose in me after this; it is enough that the vague duty and obligation I had felt upon me from the first of following the investigation was, without my distinctly daring to ask myself any question, increased, and that I was indignantly sure of there being no possibility of a reason for my being afraid.
  • And in all these years I never heard the step upon the Ghost’s Walk more distinct than it is to-night!"
  • "Sir," she says, for the moment obliged to set her lips with all the energy she has, that she may speak distinctly, "I will make it plainer.
  • Sir Leicester indistinctly answers, "Officer.
  • After watching him closely a little while, Allan puts his mouth very near his ear and says to him in a low, distinct voice, "Jo!
  • Weevle especially) put names to so many things that in course of time they find it difficult to put a name to anything quite distinctly, though they still relate to all new-comers some version of the night they have had of it, and of what they said, and what they thought, and what they saw.

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  • Martinez and his colleagues identified 21 distinct emotions made by the human face.
  • Two distinct brain networks guide our judgments.

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