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deport
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deport
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Bleak House
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as in: deport herself with dignity Define
behave in a certain manner
  • deporting himself so beautifully
  • The old housekeeper, with a gracious severity of deportment, waves her hand towards the great staircase.

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  • "The loss is yours, I assure you," said Mrs. Pardiggle with her commanding deportment.
  • He is celebrated almost everywhere for his deportment.
  • But his deportment is beautiful.
  • Old Mr. Turveydrop adored the Prince Regent on account of his deportment.
  • Just then there appeared from a side-door old Mr. Turveydrop, in the full lustre of his deportment.
  • His distinguished father did nothing whatever but stand before the fire, a model of deportment.
  • I asked, "Does he give lessons in deportment now?"
  • A levelling age is not favourable to deportment.

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  • Heaven forbid that I should disparage my dear child, but he has—no deportment.
  • CHAPTER XIV Deportment Richard left us on the very next evening to begin his new career, and committed Ada to my charge with great love for her and great trust in me.
  • The old lady, becoming more and more incensed against the master of deportment as she dwelt upon the subject, gave me some particulars of his career, with strong assurances that they were mildly stated.
  • He had a cane, he had an eye-glass, he had a snuff-box, he had rings, he had wristbands, he had everything but any touch of nature; he was not like youth, he was not like age, he was not like anything in the world but a model of deportment.
  • During the utterance of every word of this short dialogue, Lady Dedlock and Mr. Tulkinghorn, without any other alteration in their customary deportment, have looked very steadily at one another—as was natural, perhaps, in the discussion of so unusual a subject.
  • And then Prince took her arm in his and turned with great emotion and respect to his father, whose deportment at that moment was overwhelming.
  • There was something in the picture of Mr. Turveydrop bestowing his deportment on Mr. Jellyby that quite took my fancy.
  • Of course I am aware that Pa has hardly any claims to deportment, but they get on together delightfully.
  • The son, inheriting his mother’s belief, and having the deportment always before him, had lived and grown in the same faith, and now, at thirty years of age, worked for his father twelve hours a day and looked up to him with veneration on the old imaginary pinnacle.
  • "But we are not, if I may say so to one formed to be graceful both by Nature and Art—" with the high-shouldered bow, which it seemed impossible for him to make without lifting up his eyebrows and shutting his eyes "—we are not what we used to be in point of deportment."
  • Mr. Turveydrop underwent a severe internal struggle and came upright on the sofa again with his cheeks puffing over his stiff cravat, a perfect model of parental deportment.
  • And if there seemed to be but a slender chance of her and her husband ever finding out what the model of deportment really was, why that was all for the best too, and who would wish them to be wiser?
  • At once to exhibit his deportment to the best models and to keep the best models constantly before himself, he had found it necessary to frequent all public places of fashionable and lounging resort, to be seen at Brighton and elsewhere at fashionable times, and to lead an idle life in the very best clothes.
  • The power of his deportment was such that they really were as much overcome with thankfulness as if, instead of quartering himself upon them for the rest of his life, he were making some munificent sacrifice in their favour.
  • After a few words of preparation, we then went in search of Mr. Turveydrop, whom we found, grouped with his hat and gloves, as a model of deportment, on the sofa in his private apartment—the only comfortable room in the house.
  • I could have wished—you will understand the allusion, Mr. Jarndyce, for you remember my illustrious patron the Prince Regent —I could have wished that my son had married into a family where there was more deportment, but the will of heaven be done!
  • It is much in these times (and we have made an awfully degenerating business of it since the days of his Royal Highness the Prince Regent—my patron, if I may presume to say so) to experience that deportment is not wholly trodden under foot by mechanics.
  • For the mainspring of the story was that in spite of the man’s absorbing selfishness, his wife (overpowered by his deportment) had, to the last, believed in him and had, on her death-bed, in the most moving terms, confided him to their son as one who had an inextinguishable claim upon him and whom he could never regard with too much pride and deference.
  • Old Mr. Turveydrop, very apoplectic, still exhibits his deportment about town, still enjoys himself in the old manner, is still believed in in the old way.
  • Then there was old Mr. Turveydrop downstairs, in a state of deportment not to be expressed, benignly blessing Caddy and giving my guardian to understand that his son’s happiness was his own parental work and that he sacrificed personal considerations to ensure it.
  • Do not," he would sometimes add in a burst of deportment, "even allow my simple requirements to be considered if they should at any time interfere with your own, my Caroline.
  • What we should have done without him, I am afraid to think, for all the company despising the bride and bridegroom and old Mr. Turveydrop—and old Mr. Thurveydrop, in virtue of his deportment, considering himself vastly superior to all the company—it was a very unpromising case.
  • For some moments, I was so lost in reconsidering what I had heard and seen in Newman Street that I was quite unable to talk to Caddy or even to fix my attention on what she said to me, especially when I began to inquire in my mind whether there were, or ever had been, any other gentlemen, not in the dancing profession, who lived and founded a reputation entirely on their deportment.
  • He had established such a long prescriptive right to this deportment (his son’s inheritance from his mother) that I several times knew both Caddy and her husband to be melted to tears by these affectionate self-sacrifices.
  • But even this disinterestedness was attended with no inconsiderable cost, to my knowledge, for before Peepy was sufficiently decorated to walk hand in hand with the professor of deportment, he had to be newly dressed, at the expense of Caddy and her husband, from top to toe.
  • Caddy was quite transported by this reply of mine, being, I believe, as susceptible to the least kindness or encouragement as any tender heart that ever beat in this world; and after another turn or two round the garden, during which she put on an entirely new pair of gloves and made herself as resplendent as possible that she might do no avoidable discredit to the Master of Deportment, we went to Newman Street direct.
  • …papa had tranquillized his mind by becoming this shorn lamb, and they had removed to a furnished lodging in Hatton Garden (where I found the children, when I afterwards went there, cutting the horse hair out of the seats of the chairs and choking themselves with it), Caddy had brought about a meeting between him and old Mr. Turveydrop; and poor Mr. Jellyby, being very humble and meek, had deferred to Mr. Turveydrop’s deportment so submissively that they had become excellent friends.
  • "Yet the father must be garnished and tricked out," said the old lady, "because of his deportment.
  • "Where what is left among us of deportment," he added, "still lingers.
  • For old Mr. Turveydrop’s deportment is very beautiful, you know, Esther," said Caddy, "and his feelings are extremely sensitive."
  • "For myself, my children," said Mr. Turveydrop, "I am falling into the sear and yellow leaf, and it is impossible to say how long the last feeble traces of gentlemanly deportment may linger in this weaving and spinning age.
  • "My son," said Mr. Turveydrop, "for those little points in which you are deficient—points of deportment, which are born with a man, which may be improved by cultivation, but can never be originated— you may still rely on me.

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  • She launched into a lecture on deportment and dress at school.
  • The report said he "acted contrary to the NCAA principles of ethical conduct when he knowingly violated recruiting restrictions imposed by the NCAA" and "failed to deport himself with the generally recognized high standard of honesty."

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as in: deport from the U.S. Define
force someone to leave a country
  • I’d deport him!

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  • The government deported her.
  • She appealed the deportation.

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unspecified meaning
  • He had married a meek little dancing-mistress, with a tolerable connexion (having never in his life before done anything but deport himself), and had worked her to death, or had, at the best, suffered her to work herself to death, to maintain him in those expenses which were indispensable to his position.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: deport from the U.S. Define
force someone to leave a country
as in: deport herself with dignity Define
behave in a certain manner
Show Multiple Meanings
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