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convey
used in
Bleak House
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convey
Used in
Bleak House
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  • A carriage would be at Mrs. Jellyby's to convey us out of town early in the forenoon of to-morrow.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • My guardian's delicacy had soon perceived this and had tried to convey to her that he thought she was right.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Mr. Bucket asks, conveying the expression of an artist into the turn of his eye and head.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Whether it is intended to be conveyed that he was particularly pleasant to look at, on that account, does not appear.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • "How old ARE you, Phil?" asks the trooper, pausing as he conveys his smoking saucer to his lips.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Mr. Smallweed, approving of what is set before him, conveys intelligent benignity into his ancient eye and winks upon her.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Mr. Jobling approving, Smallweed puts himself under the tall hat and conveys it out of the dining-rooms in the Guppy manner.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • We have arrngd for your being forded, carriage free, pr eight o'clock coach from Reading, on Monday morning next, to White Horse Cellar, Piccadilly, London, where one of our clks will be in waiting to convey you to our offe as above.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • No entreaties on the part of the good old housekeeper will induce Mrs. Bagnet to retain the coach for her own conveyance home.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • That my mother had fled, that a person was now at our door who was empowered to convey to her the fullest assurances of affectionate protection and forgiveness if he could possibly find her, and that I was sought for to accompany him in the hope that my entreaties might prevail upon her if his failed.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But William Buffy somehow discovered, contrary to all expectation, that these were not the times when it could be done, and this was the first clear indication Sir Leicester Dedlock had conveyed to him that the country was going to pieces.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • However, when we began to jolt upon a stone pavement, and particularly when every other conveyance seemed to be running into us, and we seemed to be running into every other conveyance, I began to believe that we really were approaching the end of our journey.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • However, when we began to jolt upon a stone pavement, and particularly when every other conveyance seemed to be running into us, and we seemed to be running into every other conveyance, I began to believe that we really were approaching the end of our journey.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I put up my veil altogether, and laying my hand on Richard's sleeve and looking in his face, told him how much I thanked him for his kind welcome and how greatly I rejoiced to see him, the more so because of the determination I had made in my illness, which I now conveyed to him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In dirty upper casements, here and there, hazy little patches of candlelight reveal where some wise draughtsman and conveyancer yet toils for the entanglement of real estate in meshes of sheep-skin, in the average ratio of about a dozen of sheep to an acre of land.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In a wellregulated body politic this natural desire on the part of a spirited young gentleman so highly connected would be speedily recognized, but somehow William Buffy found when he came in that these were not times in which he could manage that little matter either, and this was the second indication Sir Leicester Dedlock had conveyed to him that the country was going to pieces.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It is more difficult to get rid of the old gentleman, Mr. George finds, than to bear a hand in carrying him downstairs, for when he is replaced in his conveyance, he is so loquacious on the subject of the guineas and retains such an affectionate hold of his button —having, in truth, a secret longing to rip his coat open and rob him—that some degree of force is necessary on the trooper's part to effect a separation.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • …Perkins and Mrs. Piper compare opinions on the subject of the young lady of professional celebrity who assists at the Harmonic Meetings and who has a space to herself in the manuscript announcement in the window, Mrs. Perkins possessing information that she has been married a year and a half, though announced as Miss M. Melvilleson, the noted siren, and that her baby is clandestinely conveyed to the Sol's Arms every night to receive its natural nourishment during the entertainments.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: convey title to the property
as in: convey her thoughts
as in: convey her safely to
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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