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badger
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badger
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Bleak House
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as in: badgered her until she agreed Define
annoy and/or persuade persistently
  • "Why, the man was so badgered and worried and tortured by being knocked about from post to pillar, and from pillar to post," said Mr. George, "that he got out of sorts.

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  • Stop badgering me. I gave you my answer and I’m not going to change it.
  • It’s not helpful if you belittle and badger her until she is too defensive to rationally discuss the issue.

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unspecified meaning
  • I wants an end of being drawed like a badger.
  • Mr. Kenge’s cousin was a Mr. Bayham Badger, who had a good practice at Chelsea and attended a large public institution besides.

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  • On the day when matters were concluded between Richard and Mr. Badger, we were all under engagement to dine at Mr. Badger’s house.
  • On the day when matters were concluded between Richard and Mr. Badger, we were all under engagement to dine at Mr. Badger’s house.
  • We were to be "merely a family party," Mrs. Badger’s note said; and we found no lady there but Mrs. Badger herself.
  • We were to be "merely a family party," Mrs. Badger’s note said; and we found no lady there but Mrs. Badger herself.
  • We had barely taken our seats when he said to Mr. Jarndyce quite triumphantly, "You would hardly suppose that I am Mrs. Bayham Badger’s third!"
  • "Her third!" said Mr. Badger.
  • Bayham Badger has not the appearance, Miss Summerson, of a lady who has had two former husbands?
  • "And most remarkable men!" said Mr. Badger in a tone of confidence.

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  • Mrs. Badger overheard him and smiled.
  • "Of European reputation," added Mr. Badger in an undertone.
  • "But for Mr. Badger’s modesty," said Mr. Jarndyce, "I would take leave to correct him and say three distinguished men."
  • Mrs. Badger considers it too yellow.
  • Over the piano, Mrs. Bayham Badger when Mrs. Swosser.
  • Over the sofa, Mrs. Bayham Badger when Mrs. Dingo.
  • Of Mrs. Bayham Badger IN ESSE, I possess the original and have no copy.
  • "Astonishing how they keep!" said Mr. Badger.
  • They were presented to Mrs. Bayham Badger when she was in the Mediterranean.
  • After dinner, when we ladies retired, we took Mrs. Badger’s first and second husband with us.
  • "The dear old Crippler!" said Mrs. Badger, shaking her head.
  • Mrs. Badger shook her head, sighed, and looked in the glass.
  • It is singular that the professor was the antipodes of Captain Swosser and that Mr. Badger is not in the least like either!
  • I have forgotten to mention—at least I have not mentioned—that Mr. Woodcourt was the same dark young surgeon whom we had met at Mr. Badger’s.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Bayham Badger coming one afternoon when my guardian was not at home, in the course of conversation I naturally inquired after Richard.
  • I said no, as Mrs. Badger’s insinuating tone seemed to require such an answer.
  • "Nor Miss Clare?" said Mrs. Bayham Badger sweetly.
  • "Why, you see, my dears," said Mrs. Badger, "—you’ll excuse me calling you my dears?"
  • We entreated Mrs. Badger not to mention it.
  • You see, my dears, that although I am still young—or Mr. Bayham Badger pays me the compliment of saying so—
  • "No," Mr. Badger called out like some one contradicting at a public meeting.
  • "Very well," smiled Mrs. Badger, "we will say still young."
  • "Undoubtedly," said Mr. Badger.
  • "A man of European reputation," murmured Mr. Badger.
  • "Remarkable assemblies those, Miss Summerson," said Mr. Badger reverentially.
  • Ada looked so very anxious now that I asked Mrs. Badger on what she founded her supposition.
  • "Does Mr. Badger think so too?" asked Ada timidly.
  • "To all professions," observed Mr. Badger.
  • "Precisely the same," said Mr. Badger.
  • "Mr. and Mrs. Badger were here yesterday, Richard," said I, "and they seemed disposed to think that you had no great liking for the profession."
  • As soon as he had it in his power to leave Mr. Badger at any moment, he began to doubt whether he wanted to leave him at all.
  • Now, if I had stayed at Badger’s I should have been obliged to spend twelve pounds at a blow for some heart-breaking lecture-fees.
  • Perhaps you may be interested, Mr. Jarndyce," continued Mr. Bayham Badger, leading the way into the next drawing-room, "in this portrait of Captain Swosser.
  • But the captain and the professor still ran in Mr. Badger’s head, and as Ada and I had the honour of being under his particular care, we had the full benefit of them.
  • His vacillations between law and medicine lasted so long that midsummer arrived before he finally separated from Mr. Badger and entered on an experimental course of Messrs.
  • Mr. Bayham Badger himself was a pink, fresh-faced, crisp-looking gentleman with a weak voice, white teeth, light hair, and surprised eyes, some years younger, I should say, than Mrs. Bayham Badger.
  • Mr. Bayham Badger himself was a pink, fresh-faced, crisp-looking gentleman with a weak voice, white teeth, light hair, and surprised eyes, some years younger, I should say, than Mrs. Bayham Badger.
  • In the course of it, Mrs. Badger signified to us that she had never madly loved but once and that the object of that wild affection, never to be recalled in its fresh enthusiasm, was Captain Swosser.
  • "So that Mrs. Badger has been married to three husbands—two of them highly distinguished men," said Mr. Badger, summing up the facts, "and each time upon the twenty-first of March at eleven in the forenoon!"
  • "So that Mrs. Badger has been married to three husbands—two of them highly distinguished men," said Mr. Badger, summing up the facts, "and each time upon the twenty-first of March at eleven in the forenoon!"
  • Kenge and Carboy in the same category with Mr. Badger, I asked him when he intended to be articled in Lincoln’s Inn.
  • Although we could have dispensed with the length at which Mr. and Mrs. Badger pursued the conversation, we both felt that it was disinterested in them to express the opinion they had communicated to us and that there was a great probability of its being sound.
  • Mrs. Badger gave us in the drawing-room a biographical sketch of the life and services of Captain Swosser before his marriage and a more minute account of him dating from the time when he fell in love with her at a ball on board the Crippler, given to the officers of that ship when she lay in Plymouth Harbour.
  • He was quite willing to receive Richard into his house and to superintend his studies, and as it seemed that those could be pursued advantageously under Mr. Badger’s roof, and Mr. Badger liked Richard, and as Richard said he liked Mr. Badger "well enough," an agreement was made, the Lord Chancellor’s consent was obtained, and it was all settled.
  • But when Mrs. Badger put it in that light, I naturally gave great consideration to it, knowing that Mrs. Badger’s mind, in addition to its natural advantages, has had the rare advantage of being formed by two such very distinguished (I will even say illustrious) public men as Captain Swosser of the Royal Navy and Professor Dingo.
  • But when Mrs. Badger put it in that light, I naturally gave great consideration to it, knowing that Mrs. Badger’s mind, in addition to its natural advantages, has had the rare advantage of being formed by two such very distinguished (I will even say illustrious) public men as Captain Swosser of the Royal Navy and Professor Dingo.
  • He was quite willing to receive Richard into his house and to superintend his studies, and as it seemed that those could be pursued advantageously under Mr. Badger’s roof, and Mr. Badger liked Richard, and as Richard said he liked Mr. Badger "well enough," an agreement was made, the Lord Chancellor’s consent was obtained, and it was all settled.
  • He was quite willing to receive Richard into his house and to superintend his studies, and as it seemed that those could be pursued advantageously under Mr. Badger’s roof, and Mr. Badger liked Richard, and as Richard said he liked Mr. Badger "well enough," an agreement was made, the Lord Chancellor’s consent was obtained, and it was all settled.
  • He helped Mr. Badger in his professional engagements, which were numerous, and had as yet no settled projects for the future.
  • That without any affectation of disparaging such professional distinction as I may have attained (which our friend Mr. Carstone will have many opportunities of estimating), I am not so weak—no, really," said Mr. Badger to us generally, "so unreasonable—as to put my reputation on the same footing with such first-rate men as Captain Swosser and Professor Dingo.
  • Howsoever, I don’t so much complain of you as of some others, and I’m agreeable to make you a civil answer, though I give notice that I’m not a-going to be drawed like a badger.
  • It was Mrs. Woodcourt, who, having come from Wales to stay with Mrs. Bayham Badger and having written to my guardian, "by her son Allan’s desire," to report that she had heard from him and that he was well "and sent his kind remembrances to all of us," had been invited by my guardian to make a visit to Bleak House.
  • "Captain Swosser of the Royal Navy, who was Mrs. Badger’s first husband, was a very distinguished officer indeed.
  • Mr. Badger replied to the smile, "I was observing to Mr. Jarndyce and Miss Summerson that you had had two former husbands—both very distinguished men.
  • "I was barely twenty," said Mrs. Badger, "when I married Captain Swosser of the Royal Navy.
  • "And when Mr. Badger and myself were married," pursued Mrs. Badger, "we were married on the same day of the year.
  • "And when Mr. Badger and myself were married," pursued Mrs. Badger, "we were married on the same day of the year.
  • What I always tell him!" observed Mrs. Badger.
  • "And, my dear," said Mr. Badger, "what do I always tell you?
  • "I feel when I look at it," said Mr. Badger, " ’That’s a man I should like to have seen!’
  • "Why, Mr. Carstone," said Mrs. Badger, "is very well and is, I assure you, a great acquisition to our society.
  • "Because you really are, if I may take the liberty of saying so," pursued Mrs. Badger, "so perfectly charming.
  • "Why," said Mr. Badger, "to tell the truth, Miss Clare, this view of the matter had not occurred to me until Mrs. Badger mentioned it.
  • "Why," said Mr. Badger, "to tell the truth, Miss Clare, this view of the matter had not occurred to me until Mrs. Badger mentioned it.
  • The conclusion at which I have arrived is—in short, is Mrs. Badger’s conclusion."
  • And I get too much of Mrs. Bayham Badger’s first and second."
  • The professor was yet dying by inches in the most dismal manner, and Mrs. Badger was giving us imitations of his way of saying, with great difficulty, "Where is Laura?
  • "When I lost my dear first and became the wife of my dear second," said Mrs. Badger, speaking of her former husbands as if they were parts of a charade, "I still enjoyed opportunities of observing youth.
  • "It was a maxim of Captain Swosser’s," said Mrs. Badger, "speaking in his figurative naval manner, that when you make pitch hot, you cannot make it too hot; and that if you only have to swab a plank, you should swab it as if Davy Jones were after you.
  • "People objected to Professor Dingo when we were staying in the north of Devon after our marriage," said Mrs. Badger, "that he disfigured some of the houses and other buildings by chipping off fragments of those edifices with his little geological hammer.
  • "And now," pursued Mrs. Badger, "now that I am the wife of my dear third, Mr. Badger, I still pursue those habits of observation which were formed during the lifetime of Captain Swosser and adapted to new and unexpected purposes during the lifetime of Professor Dingo.
  • "And now," pursued Mrs. Badger, "now that I am the wife of my dear third, Mr. Badger, I still pursue those habits of observation which were formed during the lifetime of Captain Swosser and adapted to new and unexpected purposes during the lifetime of Professor Dingo.
  • ) If I were a more constant sort of fellow, I should have held on either to Badger or to Kenge and Carboy like grim death, and should have begun to be steady and systematic by this time, and shouldn’t be in debt, and—"
  • I am now admitted (after undergoing an examination that’s enough to badger a man blue, touching a pack of nonsense that he don’t want to know) on the roll of attorneys and have taken out my certificate, if it would be any satisfaction to you to see it."

  • There are no more uses of "badger" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: badgered her until she agreed Define
annoy and/or persuade persistently
as in: saw a badger Define
burrowing mammal with strong claws widely distributed in the northern hemisphere
Show Multiple Meanings
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